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2016 Olivier Award Winners and 10 Lessons for the Tonys

August Wilson, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Stephen Sondheim and Arthur Laurents, Cyndi Lauper and Harvey Fierstein were among the winners in the UK’s 40th anniversary Olivier Awards, named after Sir Laurence Olivier. Complete list of winners below.

It’s possible that Americans are always big winners, but this is the first time it’s been broadcast in the United States (Watch it on YouTube. Click here to see it on my page)

Best Revival

Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom at National Theatre, Lyttelton

Best Entertainment and Family

Showstopper! The Improvised Musical at Apollo Theatre

Best Costume Design

Gregg Barnes for Kinky Boots at Adelphi Theatre

Blue-i Theatre Technology Award for Best Set Design

Anna Fleischle for Hangmen at Jerwood Theatre Downstairs at the Royal Court Theatre and Wyndham’s Theatre

White Light Award For Best Lighting Design

Mark Henderson for Gypsy at Savoy Theatre

Best Sound Design

Tom Gibbons for People, Places And Things at National Theatre, Dorfman

Best New Opera Production

Cavalleria Rusticana/Pagliacci at Royal Opera House

Outstanding Achievement in Opera

English National Opera Chorus and Orchestra for The Force Of Destiny, Lady Macbeth Of Mtsensk and The Queen Of Spades at London Coliseum

Best Actor in a Supporting Role

Mark Gatiss for Three Days In The Country at National Theatre, Lyttelton

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Dame Judi Dench for The Winter’s Tale at Garrick Theatre

Outstanding Achievement in an Affiliate Theatre

Pat Kinevane and Fishamble for Silent at Soho Theatre

Virgin Atlantic Best New Play

Hangmen at Jerwood Theatre Downstairs at the Royal Court Theatre and Wyndham’s Theatre

Best Actor

Kenneth Cranham for The Father at Wyndham’s Theatre

Best Actress

Denise Gough for People, Places And Things at National Theatre, Dorfman

Magic Radio Audience Award

The Phantom Of The Opera

Best New Comedy

Nell Gwynn at Apollo Theatre

Best New Dance Production

Woolf Works by Wayne McGregor at Royal Opera House

Outstanding Achievement in Dance

Alessandra Ferri for her performances in Chéri and Woolf Works at Royal Opera House

Autograph Sound Award for Outstanding Achievement in Music

In The Heights – Music and Lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Orchestrated and Arranged by Alex Lacamoire and Bill Sherman at King’s Cross Theatre

Best Theatre Choreographer

Drew McOnie for In The Heights at King’s Cross Theatre

Best Director

Robert Icke for Oresteia at Almeida Theatre

Best Actor in a Supporting Role in a Musical

David Bedella for In The Heights at King’s Cross Theatre

Best Actress in a Supporting Role in a Musical

Lara Pulver for Gypsy at Savoy Theatre

Best Musical Revival

Gypsy at Savoy Theatre

Best Actor in a Musical

Matt Henry for Kinky Boots at Adelphi Theatre

Best Actress in a Musical

Imelda Staunton for Gypsy at Savoy Theatre

 

MasterCard Best New Musical

Kinky Boots at Adelphi Theatre

 

Ten Lessons The Tony Awards Could Learn From The Olivier Awards

  1. The Oliviers described nominated straight plays and also presented scenes from each one of them.  (The Tonys just describe nominated plays.)
  2. The Oliviers have TWO awards for best sound. (The Tonys have eliminated the sound category entirely.)
  3. The Olivier Awards are not limited to productions of plays and musicals on the West End. (The Tonys are limited to Broadway plays and musicals, with just one exception.)
  4. The Oliviers offered a tasteful In Memoriam where pictures of those who died filled the screen, and Michael Feinstein’s musical accompaniment (he sang George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin’s “They Can’t Take That Away From Me) did not dominate.
  5. The (fine) orchestra was not used to cut off winners’ speeches.  Best Actor winner Kenneth Cranham for The Father gave a lengthy, somewhat rambling acceptance speech that was all the more affecting for being un-canned.
  6. There was no (or at least very little) cutesy patter between the presenters.
  7. They created a musical medley out of Shakespeare’s sonnets, in honor of the 400th anniversary of his death.
  8. The Olivier Awards included an intermission.
  9. There were no commercials (except embedded in the names of the individual awards — an idea one hopes that Tonys will NOT borrow.)
  10. The Olivier Awards is not solely a creature of television (at least not yet.)  It began before “prime time” and ended at a civilized hour — 9 p.m. in London.
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About New York Theater
Jonathan Mandell is a 3rd generation NYC journalist, who sees shows, reads plays, writes reviews and sometimes talks with people.

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