Off Broadway Fall 2015 Guide

The new season’s Off-Broadway offerings are various, intriguing, and sometimes hard to describe — an absurdist kitchen-sink comedy about a dysfunctional family with a transgender son; a musical about First Ladies and their daughters; an all-female Shakespeare and an all-new evening of Tennessee Williams; a new work by an old rock star.

man_who_fell_to_earth

Off-Broadway has a knack for creating its own rock stars. They don’t necessarily sing, or even act. Some are playwrights or directors.

Take Danai Gurira.

Playwright and actress Danai Gurira at Playwrights Horizons

She is best known for her role as Michonne on The Walking Dead. But she is also a playwright, who will be debuting two different plays Off-Broadway this season -Familiar at Playwright Horizons and Eclipsed at The Public Theater, which will star Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years a Slave)

lupita-nyongo

Or take Ivo van Hove, the experimental theater director from Belgium who made a splash last year with both Scenes from A Marriage and Angels in America.

Ivo van HoveArthurMillerHe’s making his Broadway debut with two different plays by Arthur Miller, “A View from The Bridge” in the Fall and “The Crucible” in the Spring. October marks the centennial of Miller’s birth, so there are two more revivals of Miller’s work Off-Broadway.

But van Hove is also directing Juliette Binoche in a new adaptation of Antigone at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and directing Lazarus, written by Enda Walsh and David Bowie (that rock star I mentioned) at New York Theatre Workshop.

It’s short-sighted to treat Off-Broadway in the same way as Broadway — as a collection of individual potential hits or misses. (See my Broadway Fall 2015 Preview Guide.)  Off-Broadway is more spread out, more numerous (some 200 theaters/theater companies, or five times the number of Broadway houses), less publicized. As most serious theatergoers will tell you,  Off Broadway has far richer, more adventurous and more diverse offerings, at a lower price. It is also in some ways more connected.

I organize my Off-Broadway preview below by the theaters in which they are being produced, in order of my preference for these theaters (determined by such factors as their recent track record, the promise of the new season, and by the overall experience I’ve had with the theater.)

PLAYWRIGHTS HORIZONS playwrights horizons logo

416 W. 42nd St. Twitter: @PHNYC

Annie Baker’s “The Flick” is one of six plays that originated at Playwrights Horizons that have won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. It offers new plays and musicals that are consistently satisfying, or at least intriguing.

playwrightsHorizonsFall2015

The Christians
August 28 – October 11; opens September 17

In this play by Lucas Hnath, Pastor Paul, who has built a megachurch, ” is about to preach a sermon that will shake the foundation of his congregation’s beliefs.” Although it’s a straight play, it includes a gospel choir.

Hir
October 16 – November 29; opens November 8.

Written by Taylor Mac, the gender-bending theater star of many talents, this comic and dramatic exercise in what Mac calls “absurd realism” features the extraordinary Kristine Nielsen (Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike) as a mother who sees herself as liberated from an oppressive marriage. Her son Isaac, returning from military service, sees her as abusive towards his father (Daniel Oreskes) who’s had a stroke. “Hir” is pronounced “here” and is the pronoun preferred by Isaac’s transgender sibling Max, portrayed by Tom Phelan (The Fosters),

Marjorie Prime
November 20 – January 3, 2016; opens December 14

The inimitable Lois Smith stars in Jordan Harrison’s play.”It’s the age of artificial intelligence, and 86-year-old Marjorie — a jumble of disparate, fading memories — has a handsome new companion who’s programmed to feed the story of her life back to her.”

Spring, 2016

Familiar by Danai Gurira

Antlia Pneumatica by Anne Washburn

Indian Summer by Gregory S. Moss

THE PUBLIC THEATER

publictheaterlogo425 Lafayette Street. Twitter: @PublicTheaterNY

Having originated both Hamilton and Fun Home, the Public is on a roll

Public Works’ The Odyssey
September 4-7

Director Lear deBessonet and lyricist/composer Todd Almond team up for the third time,  to reimagine the Greek epic with professional actors and some 200 community members.

Barbecue
September 22-November 1

In this play written by Robert O’Hara, whose Bootycandy I found outrageously entertaining, uncomfortable and profound, the O’Mallerys have gathered in their local park to share some barbecue and stage an intervention with a family member in a spiral of drugs and recklessness.

Eclipsed
September 29 – November 8

Eclipsed cast

Eclipsed cast

Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years a Slave) stars in the play by Danai Gurira (co-author of In the Continuum and Michonne on AMC’s “The Walking Dead”.) Amid the chaos of the Liberian Civil War, the captive wives of a rebel officer band together to form a fragile community – until the balance of their lives is upset by the arrival of a new girl. Directed by South African-born Liesl Tommy (Appropriate, Informed Consent)

First Daughter Suite
October 6-November 15

Michael John LaChiusa  (GiantThe Wild Party) has created a musical of mothers and daughters who’ve lived in the White House: Patricia Nixon and daughters Tricia and Julie, Roselyn and Amy Carter, Betty and Susan Ford, Patti Davis and mom Nancy Reagan, and Barbara Bush and daughter-in-law Laura. Casting so far includes Marty Testa, Rachel Bay Jones, Theresa McCarthy, Betsy Morgan, Isabel Santiago, Carly Tamer, and Barbara Walsh.
Before Your Very Eyes 
October 17 – November 29
Gob Squad created this unique piece with New Yorkers 8-14 years old.   From behind the safety of one-way mirrors, the audience witness seven lives lived in fast forward—from angst-ridden teens to hunched geriatrics.

The Comedy of Errors
November 1-22

Directed by Kwame Kwei-Armah, this production of Shakespeare’s comedy will tour the five boroughs followed by a limited three-week engagement at The Public as part of The Mobile Shakespeare Unit,

Under the Radar Festival, 12th edition
January 6-17, 2016

Cutting-edge theater from around the U.S. and the world.

 

new_york_01NEW YORK THEATER WORKSHOP

79 East 4th Street. Twitter: @NYTW79

Fondly, Collette Richland

September 11 to October 18; opens September 28

“When Mr. and Mrs. “Fritz” Fitzhubert are summoned through a wee little secret door in their living room, they enter into a phantasmagorical world of Alpen hotels, mysterious employees, perilous hikes, and ancient deities, that will leave their lives forever altered.” A collaboration between the Elevator Repair Service (The Gatz) and their first living writer, playwright Sibyl Kempson.

Lazarus

Lazarus

November 18 – December 27; opens December 7

Directed by Ivo van Hove, starring Michael C. Hall and written by David Bowie and Enda Walsh, the musical is inspired by the 1963 novel The Man Who Fell to Earth about an alien who crash lands on our planet. Bowie, who portrayed the alien in a 1976 film, will be writing original songs.

SIGNATURE

signature_01

480 West 42nd Street. Twitter: @signaturetheatr

As the first New York theater to win the Regional Tony Award, the Signature now has some solid proof of what has been clear to its patrons for years.  What has distinguished this theater is not only its track record, but its commitment to keep the price of all tickets for initial runs to $25.

This season is special for two reasons — it’s the 25th anniversary season, and it’s the last one under founding artistic director James Houghton. Except for the Arthur Miller revival, however, the real excitement of this season comes in the Spring.

John

July 22 – September 6, 2015

The sixth collaboration between playwright Annie Baker and director Sam Gold, though in my review, I suggest not the best.

Love and Money

August 15 – October 4, 2015

A new comedy by A.R. Gurney, which I review here

Incident at Vichy

October 27 – December 6, 2015

Arthur Miller’s play looks at Vichy, France at the height of World War II, when nine men and a boy are rounded up. As they disappear one by one, they battle over politics, philosophy and how to escape.

Night Is A Room

November 3 – December 13, 2015

LINCOLN CENTER THEATER*

@LCTheater

The shows at Lincoln Center’s Off-Broadway venues are inexpensive (especially at the Claire Tow theater, where initial-run tickets cost $20) and often rewarding.

Dada Woof Papa Hot

dadawoof300x300.jpeg__480x480_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale

October 15 to January 3. Opens November 9

In this new play by Peter Parnell (QED), two gay couples who met at a parents group get to know one another and reveal the cracks in their marriages, and that of their straight friends. The cast includes Tammy Blanchard, Patrick Breen, John Benjamin Hickey

MTC AT CITY CENTER*

131 West 55th Street Twitter: @MTC_NYC

Ripcord

MarylouiseBurkeHollandTaylor

September 29 to ; opens October 20
Holland Taylor, Marylouise Burke, and Rachel Dratch. David Hyde Pierce directs
David Lindsay-Abaire’s new play about two rivals who vie for a choice room in an assisted living facility

Important Hats of the 20th Century

opens November 25
Written by Nick Jones (Orange is the New Black, Trevor) and directed by Moritz Von Stuelpnagel (Hand to God)
a cutthroat rivalry between milliners in 1930s New York.

Prodigal Son

January 19 to ; opens February 9
John Patrick Shanley’s new play, which he directs, stars Robert Sean Leonard, and
Timothée Chalamet as a brilliant, troubled young man from the Bronx at a New Hampshire private school.

ROUNDABOUT* LAURA PELS

Ugly Lies The Bone

September 10 to November 22. Opens October 13.

uglyliesthebone

Female soldier Jess returns from war severely burned only to find her Floridian hometown in a state of decay. With the use of virtual reality video game therapy, she desperately tries to restore her relationships, home and all that was lost. Mamie Gummer stars

The Humans

September 30 to; Opens October 25

A terrific cast including Reed Birney, Jayne Houdyshell, Joyce Van Patten and Sarah Steele star in the latest play by Stephen Karam (Sons of the Prophet). When Erik Blake (Birney) brings his Pennsylvania family to his daughter’s Manhattan apartment to celebrate Thanksgiving, strange things start happening.

MCC THEATER

Address: The Lucille Lortel Theatre, 121 Christopher Street. Twitter: @mcctheater

The Legend of Georgia McBride 

How can an Elvis impersonator become a winning drag queen in the Florida Panhandle? With an empty bank account and pregnant wife, Casey’s going to have to answer that question fast in this music-filled comedy written by Matthew Lopez (“The Whipping Man.”)

RATTLESTICK PLAYWRIGHTS


rattle_01
224 Waverly Place (though frequently also at the Cherry Lane) Twitter:  @RattlestickNY

Hamlet in Bed

Michael Laurence and Annette O’Toole star in Laurence’s play about a neurotic actor and adoptee tracks down a woman who might be his birth mother and asks her to star with him in Hamlet.

CLASSIC STAGE COMPANY

September 10 to 27; opens September 17.

IgphigeniainAulisposter

As part of CSC’s inaugural Greek Festival, Playwright Anne Washburn (Mr. Burns, a post-electric play) and director Rachel Chavkin (Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812) team up in this dynamic imagining of Euripides’ rarely-seen final play. A father is challenged to sacrifice his daughter in order to appease the gods.

mothercourage_800x315

Mother Courage and her Children

December 9

Tonya Pinkins stars in Bertolt Brecht’s most popular play as the indomitable Mother Courage,who follows one luckless army after another across a war-torn world in her canteen wagon. Duncan Sheik (Spring Awakening) has written a new score for the play.

OTHER (POTENTIAL) HIGHLIGHTS

Desire (59E59 )

Opens September 10

Desire

An evening of plays based on six short stories by Tennessee Williams, adapted by Elizabeth Egloff, Marcus Gardley, Rebecca Gilman, David Grimm, John Guare, and Beth Henley.

Steve, at The New Group, written by Mark Gerrard, directed by Cynthia Nixon, starring Mario Cantone (“As Steven, a failed Broadway chorus boy turned stay-at-home dad, celebrates yet another birthday, he finds himself filled with fear and uncertainty. Is Stephen, his partner of 14 years, cheating on him?”)

GiganticatVineyardposter

Gigantic, at Vineyard Theater, November 11 – December 20, 2015. A coming-of-age musical that takes places at Camp Overton, the number three weight-loss camp for teenagers in Southern Pennsylvania.

Antigone at BAM

Always worth checking out: Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival which focuses on avant-garde experimental and European works. Of particular interest this year (as I mentioned earlier), a new version of Antigone directed by Ivo van Hove and starring Juliette Binoche.

HenryIVStAnnes

Henry IV at St. Ann’s Warehouse, an all-female production by the same team that brought us the terrific all-female Julius Caesar.

DaddyLongLegs
Daddy Long Legs, Davenport Theatre
.Based on the 1912 novel by Jean Webster, the musical tells the story of Jerusha Abbott, the oldest orphan in the John Grier Home and the mysterious benefactor who sends her to college to be a writer. Required to write him a letter once a month, Jerusha is never to know the benefactor’s identity—so she invents one for him: Daddy Long Legs.

Other companies worth checking out:

Ars Nova

Atlantic

Irish Repertory Theater

Primary Stages

Second Stage 

There are also commercial shows put together by independent producers that appear in theaters for rent, such as:

Cherry Lane Theatre
Daryl Roth Theatre
Gym at Judson
Lucille Lortel Theatre
New World Stages
Orpheum Theater
The Players Theatre
Snapple Theater Center
Theatre Row – The Acorn
Union Square Theater
Westside Theatre

*THE ASTERISK: Off-Broadway AND Broadway

*Just to complicate matters, several of the resident theaters also present shows on Broadway –  Lincoln Center, Manhattan Theater Company (MTC), the Roundabout Theater Company., and starting this season, Second Stage Theatre, which has bought the Helen Hayes. Their Broadway offerings are listed in my Broadway Fall 2015 Preview Guide.

What Is Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off-Off Broadway?

Off-Broadway theaters, by definition, have anywhere from 99 to 499 seats. If a theater has more seats than that, it’s a Broadway house. If it has fewer, it’s Off-Off Broadway.

There are some terrific Off-Off Broadway theaters, sometimes confused for Off-Broadway. These include (but are not limited to) The FleaLabyrinth Theater, and LaMaMa ETC.

Monthly Calendar of Openings

Because there are so many shows Off-Off Broadway, and their runs are so limited, I include them in my monthly theater preview (along with Broadway and Off Broadway openings) posted near the beginning of each month.

Here’s the preview guide for September, 2015.)

FOR MORE INFORMATION

For more information about Off-Broadway, go to  The League of Off-Broadway Theatres and Producers (aka The Off-Broadway League).  This should not be confused with the Off-Broadway Alliance, which is a separate organization (though they should probably merge, no?)

New York Theater August 2015 Quiz

How well were you paying attention to the New York theater news and reviews in August? Answer these dozen questions to see.

2015 Fringe Excellence Award Winners

Fringe The Broken Record

The Broken Record

Overall Play:
The Broken Record

Popesical

Popesical

Divine Intervention
Little One
Maybe Tomorrow
Night of the Living

Overall Musical:
The Crack in the Ceiling
Far From Canterbury
Popesical

Solo Performance:
butyou’reaman or: The Seven Men I Came Out to in India
An Inconvenient Poop
Tiananmen Annie

Ensemble:
The Curious Case of Phineas Gage
Running Interference
Stockholm Savings
Verano Place

Playwriting:
Martin Casella – The Report
Ashley J. Jacobson – The American Play
Lisa Lewis – Schooled
Jim Shankman – The Screenwriter Dies Of His Own Free Will

Directing:
Stephen Broteback – St. Francis
William Oldroyd – Fuente Ovejuna
Courtney Ulrich – Sousepaw: ‘A Baseball Story’

Costumes:
Jennifer Brawn-Gittings – She-Rantulas From Outer Space in 3-D!

Video Design:
Lianne Arnold – The Mad Scientist’s Guide to Romance, Robots and Soul-Crushing Loneliness

Acting:
Lauren LaRocca – Coping
Lori Hammel – Hell Is For Real
Jesse Carrey – To Dance – The Musical
Rebecca Vigil & Evan Kaufman – Your Love, Our Musical
Xander Johnson – The Boys Are Angry
David Logan Rankin – Night with Guests

The winners were selected by an independent panel of over 30 theater professionals,

Kyle Jean-Baptiste Memorial Service. Forest Whitaker Debuting, Daniel Craig Quitting Broadway. Week in New York Theater

kyle-jean-baptiste2

An informal memorial service will be held in Central Park Monday afternoon for Kyle Jean-Baptiste, 21, the youngest actor and first African-American to portray Jean Valjean in Les Miserables on Broadway

Jean-Baptiste died on Aug. 29 after falling from a fourth-story fire escape in Bedford-Stuyvesant.
The gathering will be held August 31, 2015 at the Bethesda Fountain at 2 p.m.

Jean-Baptiste was an ensemble performer and an understudy for the role of Valjean. He first appeared on stage in the role on July 23rd.

The actor, who was active on social media, Tweeted before and after his performance:

Three days ago, on Instagram he made his farewell to Les Miserables, showing himself with and without the Les Miz makeup.  He was going to join the cast of The Color Purple on September 6th.

Baptistekyle1onInstagram

Some videos of his remarkable singing:

Week in New York Theater Reviews

Love and Money Maureen Anderman Gabriel Brown Joe Paulik

Love and Money
Maureen Anderman
Gabriel Brown
Joe Paulik

My review of Love and Money

“Love and Money,” A.R. Gurney’s latest comedy about WASPs, is as deep as dust, and no more solid, but as dust goes, it’s a fine light powder, ground by a craftsman who’s been at it for some four decades, and it’s more likely to tickle than to irritate…In a brownstone on the Upper East Side, Cornelia Cunningham (Maureen Anderman) is packing up for a move to a fancy retirement community that she insists on calling a nursing home. At the same time, she is writing checks with a lot of zeroes; she has decided to give away all her considerable wealth to charity…A young African-American man suddenly appears at the brownstone, claiming to be her grandson.

Full review of Love and Money

Daniel J. Watts, Derrick Baskin and Ryan Quinn

Daniel J. Watts, Derrick Baskin and Ryan Quinn

My review of Whorl Inside a Loop

Sherie Rene Scott’s new play at Second Stage Theater, about an actress teaching a class of murderers at a men’s prison, has much that is admirable and even heart-warming. Yet, the creative team more or less manages to turn the inmates into supporting players in what should be their story…What’s good about ‘Whorl Inside a Loop,’ especially the acting, would make its self-indulgent aspects matter less, if the show weren’t entering a theatrical landscape already dotted with well-done prison dramas, most notable among them plays created and performed by ex-inmates.”

Full review of Whorl Inside a Loop

ADelicateShipDellapina,Silverman,Westrate

My review of A Delicate Ship

‘A Delicate Ship’ is a lyrical play with some of the rich intricacy and circumlocution of a poem. To appreciate Ziegler’s play, theatergoers should be open to spending time with the kind of characters who philosophize about suffering over glasses of wine on Christmas Eve…Director Margot Bordelon treats us to a lively pace for such a contemplative piece, and the actors are so good I never once had the urge to yell out ‘Oh, get over yourselves and go bowling.’ (Well, maybe once.)”

Full review of A Delicate Ship

Week in New York Theater News

Theater openings in September

BroadwaySpringseason

Broadway Poll: Which Fall 2015 Show Most Excites You?

15th-Line-Twitter_opt

Starting Monday: a Twitter play – which is a revival because nobody does Twitter plays anymore.
My piece in American Theatre about The 15th Line.

The first tweet is alarming: “Breaking News – Subway accident at 15th St. Station. 21 believed dead, 17 injured. Cause is not yet known.”  It comes from Patrick Hearson (@patcitypress), a journalist at City Press.

Actually, Hearson is not a real journalist—he’s a character in The 15th Line, a play by Philadelphia-based playwright Jeremy Gable written specifically for Twitter. Beginning on Aug. 31, 2015,  and for every day following for eight weeks, the drama will take shape as a total of some 300 tweets by Patrick and three other characters.

“The idea came during a time in which I was working from home and spent a lot of time on Twitter,” Gable explains. “I was struck by how certain events were being covered first or more comprehensively on Twitter than on other news sources. I came to realize that this simple platform was combining the personal with the global, taking huge events and showing us an up-close view.”

That’s exactly what The 15th Line does: A reporter character gives the overview, and the other characters tweet about how they are affected. But in an irony of our digital age: The show is actually a revival. Gable first wrote and tweeted The 15th Line in 2010, when it unfolded every day over some two months. Now director and teacher Erin Mee will be doing the tweeting.

Full article 

Forest-Whitaker

Forest Whitaker will make his Broadway debut in Eugene O’Neill’s two-character play Hughie in Spring 2016.

Downstairs_lamama

The Downstairs,La MaMa ETC’s fourth theater, will open in Nov at 66 E 4th St basement.150 seats, classroom,exhibition space,new media focus.

How do you get stars like Nathan Lane and Debra Messing to do a reading of your plays? Be Wesley Taylor. Oct 26 at New World Stages

Pictured: Denzel Washington (Troy Maxson) & Viola Davis (Rose)

Pictured: Denzel Washington (Troy Maxson) & Viola Davis (Rose)

A film version of August Wilson’s Fences to star Viola Davis, directed by Denzel Washington. (It’s unclear whether Washington will play Troy, the part he played on Broadway with Davis.)

Daniel Craig in Betrayal on Broadway. This is the last time he'll be on Broadway, because the audience is his age.

Daniel Craig in Betrayal on Broadway. This is the last time he’ll be on Broadway, because the audience is closet to his age, which is 47.

Daniel Craig, interviewed by Martin McDonagh
“I’d like to do some theater in New York. I’ve done Broadway and I was happy with that, but I don’t want to do Broadway anymore.”
Why?
“The audience is all over 50, on the whole, and I think new faces and cheaper tickets are the only way forward. And it’s never going to happen.”

David Lawson: Daniel Craig should put his money where his mouth is and do a show with $18 tickets.
J Adrian Verkouteren:  He could try holding a lottery for less expensive seats the way Hamilton does.

Why are so many creative people neurotic? Study: on neurotic and creative Both marked by high levels of “self-generated thought.”

September 2015 Theater Openings on Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off-Off Broadway

SAforcalendar

scene from Spring Awakening

Deaf West’s revival of “Spring Awakening” is the only Broadway show opening in September.

Other New York theater that looks promising this month: Desire, an evening of plays adapted from Tennessee Williams short stories

The Christians by Lucas Hnath

the musical Daddy Long Legs

and new work by Matthew Lopez (The Whipping Man), Anne Washburn (Mr. Burns), Thomas Bradshaw (Job),  and The Elevator Repair Service (Gatz), as well as the New York City debut of a work by the Neo-Political Cowgirls.

But you can’t know for sure until you see the show, which is why I review.

Below is a selection of the plays, musicals and “immersive” theater pieces opening in September, organized chronologically by opening date. Each title is linked to a relevant website.

Color key: Broadway: Red. Off Broadway: Purple or Blue. Off Off Broadway: Green.

September 2

In Bed With Roy Cohen (Theatre Row)

At the end of his life, Roy Cohen is visited by people from his past making him account for his deeds, including Julius Rosenberg, Ronald Reagan, Barbara Walters, Roy’s lover Serge, his mother Dora, and his own youthful self.

September 3

Where Was I? (Theatre 54)

Actress Karen Ludwig’s autobiographical solo show.

September 8

Little Thing, Big Thing (59e59)

An Irish ex-con and a nun are thrust into the world of international oil skullduggery, awakening passions they thought were dead.

September 9

TheLegendofGeorgiaMcBrideforcalendar_wayne_duvall__matt_mcgrath__dave_thomas_brown_in_the_legend_of_georgia_mcbride_(photo_by_joan_marcus)

The Legend of Georgia McBride (MCC at Lucille Lortel)

How can an Elvis impersonator become a winning drag queen in the Florida Panhandle? With an empty bank account and pregnant wife, Casey’s going to have to answer that question fast in this music-filled comedy written by Matthew Lopez (“The Whipping Man.”)

Laugh It Up, Stare It Down (Cherry Lane)

“This is a story of Cleo and Joe — the meeting of their minds, the entwining of their hearts, and their life-long search for a meaningful point in a universe too random to have one.”

September 10

Desire (59E59 )

Desire

An evening of plays based on six short stories by Tennessee Williams, adapted by Elizabeth Egloff, Marcus Gardley, Rebecca Gilman, David Grimm, John Guare, and Beth Henley.

Stoopdreamer (The Cell)

Presented as part of the 1st Irish Theatre Festival,  the play suggests the lingering effects of gentrification as three locals meet in the last remaining Irish saloon in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Windsor Terrace, and reveal secrets from their past that may have ultimately stunted their futures.

Isolde (Theatre for a New Audience)

Inspired by the legend of Tristan and Isolde, the play is written and directed by Richard Maxwell. The marriage of Patrick and Isolde appears to be happy, but then Isolde hires architect Maximo to build her dream house.

Judy (New Ohio Theatre)

“It’s the winter of 2040, and the world has changed – but maybe not by much. Timothy’s wife has just left him, and he isn’t taking it well..What happens when technology fails and communication breaks down.” A comedy by Max Posner produced by Page 73.

Hamlet In Bed (Rattlestick Playwrights Theater)

Michael Laurence and Annette O’Toole star in Laurence’s play about a neurotic actor and adoptee tracks down a woman who might be his birth mother and asks her to star with him in Hamlet.

EVE (Gym at Judson)

Evepic

An immersive dance theater experience by the Neo-Political Cowgirls (“exploring and celebrating the female voice”),where the audience wanders at will through the expanse of an 11-room set, swaddled by music and art.

September 13

The Black Book (Sargent Theatre)

A college student disguises his suicide note in a poem and leaves it in his poetry professor’s classroom. The apprehensive professor, is compelled to delve into his student’s past and unravel the clues within his poem in attempt to save him

Pondling (59E59)

Genevieve Hulme-Beaman’s one-woman play presents a “strange lonely child who lives life in the grip of her own vivid imagination.”

September 17

The Christians (Playwrights Horizons)

TheChristiansposter

In this play by Lucas Hnath, Pastor Paul, who has built a megachurch, ” is about to preach a sermon that will shake the foundation of his congregation’s beliefs.”

Iphigenia in Aulis (Classic Stage Company)

IgphigeniainAulisposter

As part of CSC’s inaugural Greek Festival, Playwright Anne Washburn (Mr. Burns, a post-electric play) and director Rachel Chavkin (Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812) team up in this dynamic imagining of Euripides’ rarely-seen final play. A father is challenged to sacrifice his daughter in order to appease the gods.

September 18

Boys in the Club (Regeneration at Access Theater)

Meet Hector. Hector used to go out with Alan who is now going out with Eddie who just met Gucci, the house boy, and Pippin, the Drama Queen. And yes, Hector’s the one in the bad drag…In the course of the evening, they reveal hopes, fears, and how they are still coming to terms with HIV.

September 21

The New Morality (Mint Theater)

The New Morality Mint

A revival of the play by Harold Chapin, who died on the battlefield in 1915 at the age of 29. Aboard a houseboat on a fashionable reach of the Thames in 1911, “Betty Jones has been simmering for weeks, watching her husband make an ass of himself by paying excessive attention to their neighbor, Muriel Wister. Betty finally boils over and tells Muriel exactly what she thinks of her”

Fulfillment (The Flea)

Thomas Bradshaw’s new play about a man who has a new girlfriend and a new apartment, but is about to enter hell. The play “tackles the question: what makes us happy?” As in many of Bradshaw’s plays, this one includes violence, nudity and sexual situations.

September 24

Conversations with My Molester: A Journey of Faith (The Bridge Theatre)

ConversationswithMyMolesterforCalendarmichael-mack_conversations_timo217_prayer_6x10_300dpi_credit-Timothy-Hanson

A one-man show by Michael Mack about meeting 40 years laters with the priest who molested him at age 11.

September 27

Spring Awakening (Brooks Atkinson)

An 18-week run of this revival of the 2006 Broadway musical, based on Frank Wedekind’s 19th century German play about the coming-of-age, and coming-to-rebellion, of a dozen young people. This production, originally mounted in Los Angeles, is in English and American Sign Language, features a large cast of relative newcomers, as well as Camryn Manheim, Krysta Rodriguez and Andy Mientus, and marks the Broadway debut of Marlee Matlin.

Antigone (BAM)

Juliette Binoche plays stubborn heroine in this feminist version of Sophocles’s tragedy, with a new translation by Anne Carson, directed by Ivo van Hove. Part of the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s New Wave Festival.

Antigone at BAM

September 28


Daddy Long Legs (Davenport Theatre)

Based on the 1912 novel by Jean Webster, the musical tells the story of Jerusha Abbott, the oldest orphan in the John Grier Home and the mysterious benefactor who sends her to college to be a writer. Required to write him a letter once a month, Jerusha is never to know the benefactor’s identity—so she invents one for him: Daddy Long Legs.

Fondly, Collette Richland (New York Theatre Workshop)

“When Mr. and Mrs. “Fritz” Fitzhubert are summoned through a wee little secret door in their living room, they enter into a phantasmagorical world of Alpen hotels, mysterious employees, perilous hikes, and ancient deities, that will leave their lives forever altered.” A collaboration between the Elevator Repair Service (The Gatz) and their first living writer, playwright Sibyl Kempson.

Have a play or musical opening in New York in September that I didn’t mention — or one in October you want to make sure I mention in next month’s calendar? E-mail me at NewYorkTheater.me@gmail.com

A Delicate Ship Review: Lyrical Triangle of Love, Sadness, Memory and Cheez Doodles

ADelicateShipDellapina,Silverman,WestrateOn Christmas Eve, Sarah and her new boyfriend Sam are enjoying each other’s company, engaging in a philosophical debate about the nature of suffering, when there is a knock on the door; Sarah’s childhood friend Nate is paying her an unexpected visit.

“What if we just hadn’t opened the door?” Sarah says to the audience. “I sometimes get trapped in the loop of that question. To this day, it can take hours to get out of that loop.”

In this way, playwright Anna Ziegler lets us know from the get-go that this one night will change the lives of all three characters.

DelicateShip3aBut the unfurling of that night in real time is just one layer in the Playwrights Realm lovely production of “A Delicate Ship,” featuring a terrific three-member cast. Another layer is made of the characters’ memories of that regretted night, recalling those memories both to the audience and to each other.  Then there are their memories during that night, and their hopes and predictions that night for the future…and their memories of those hopes.  “A Delicate Ship” is a lyrical play with some of the rich intricacy and circumlocution of a poem. That’s a description, not a warning, although to appreciate Ziegler’s play, theatergoers should be open to spending time with the kind of characters who philosophize about suffering over glasses of wine on Christmas Eve, and ask one another “Are you happy?”

The quick and honest answer is no, they are not, but for different reasons and in different ways. On this particular night, Sarah (Miriam Silverman) is still mourning the death of her father earlier in the year. Sam (Matt Dellapina) , who has been weaned on depressing Russian writers, isn’t yet certain about anything – his talent, his career as a musician, his future with Sarah. Nate (Nick Westlake), one gathers, is doomed to unhappiness; his parents have told him he won’t grow up “because growing up means acknowledging that life isn’t perfect.”

Nate seems outright cheerful, however, when he barges in on this night, bearing gifts –a bottle of champagne, a joint, and “the biggest bag of Cheez Doodles I could find.” Sarah makes clear she doesn’t like Cheez Doodles. Nate suggests it’s more complicated than that: “In sixth grade, you ate Cheez Doodles every Tuesday and Thursday on your way home from ballet in the car service with your mom. Then you got sick of them and we made up a No-More-Cheez-Doodles dance that we performed for my babysitter and her sister who was visiting from Barbados and you haven’t had them since.”

“How do you remember that?” Sarah says.

One of the marvels of the interaction between Nate and Sarah is watching the reaction on Sam’s face. Dellapina is wonderful at reminding us of the awkward, irritating, familiar and funny experience of feeling left out in the company of two long-time friends reminiscing and reveling in each other’s company.

“Did you go out or something?” Sam finally asks.

“No,” Nate replies, “it’s much more serious than that.”

As we sensed all along, we eventually see that Nate’s visit is not just by happenstance. Not knowing but suspecting that he is up to something has been part of what keeps us engaged.

Director Margot Bordelon treats us to a lively pace for such a contemplative piece, and the actors are so good I never once had the urge to yell out “Oh, get over yourselves and go bowling.” (Well, maybe once.) But action and plot are not this play’s strong suit. This is a play about sorrow and memory, memory and sorrow, as striking and ceaseless and circular as those long, youthful late-night conversations you had with someone you thought you might love, and who might love you.

The key to unlocking “A Delicate Ship,” and its title, comes near the end when Sarah reads from W.H. Auden’s poem, “Musee Des Beaux Arts,” which is about the painting “Landscape with the Fall of Icarus” by Pieter Bruegel.

art-pieter-bruegel-the-elder-landscape-with-the-fall-of-icarus

Everybody in the painting is going about their business, oblivious to the boy in the right-hand corner who is drowning in the sea, having fallen from the sky. Even the “delicate ship” near the boy, Auden writes, “had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.” Suffering, Auden observes in the poem, takes place “while someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along.”
“It’s about what happens when no one is watching,” Sarah says.
“And how the world moves on,” Sam adds. They both are explaining the poem, and the painting, and the play they’re in.

A Delicate Ship
Playwrights Realm at Peter Sharp Theater (416 West 42nd Street)
By Anna Ziegler
Directed by Margot Bordelon

Reid Thompson (Scenic Design), Sydney Maresca (Costume Design), Nicole Pearce (Lighting Design) and Palmer Hefferan (Sound Design). Alyssa K. Howard, Production Stage Manager

Cast: Matt Dellapina as Sam, Miriam Silverman as Sarah and NickWestrate as Nate.

Running time: 80 minutes, no intermission.
Tickets: $25-$35. (Rush tickets for $10)

The Delicate Ship is scheduled to play through September 12, 2015

Whorl Inside a Loop Review: Lessons from Prison Inmates for a Broadway Star

 Ryan Quinn Sherie Rene Scott Nicholas Christopher


Ryan Quinn
Sherie Rene Scott
Nicholas Christopher

Sherie Rene Scott’s new play at Second Stage Theater, about an actress teaching a class of murderers at a men’s prison, recalls in at least one unfortunate way her Second Stage show of half a dozen years ago, “Everyday Rapture,” which had a brief Broadway run. “Rapture,” which Scott co-wrote with Dick Scanlan and Michael Mayer directed, was a musical starring Scott inspired by Scott’s real-life journey from her Mennonite childhood in Kansas to her career as “one of Broadway’s biggest, brightest semi-stars.”  “Whorl Inside a Loop,” also co-written by Dick Scanlan and directed by Michael Mayer, is a straight play inspired by Scott’s work with male inmates at Woodbourne Correctional Facility in upstate New York, via an organization called Rehabilitation Through the Arts. “Whorl Inside a Loop” showcases the impressive talents of a half-dozen other actors, who portray not just the inmates in orange jumpsuits but at least two (and as many as four) other characters apiece, white and black, male and female. Yet to a surprising and disconcerting degree, “Whorl,” like “Rapture,” revolves around Sherie Rene Scott.

Now, there is much that is admirable and even heart-warming about the play and the story behind the play. Five of the participants in Scott’s Woodbourne workshop are getting credit in “Whorl” for “additional material,” and their participation reportedly helped get most of them paroled.

Yet, the creative team more or less manages to turn the inmates into supporting players in what should be their story.

Scott portrays a character who is called only “The Volunteer.” She is not literally Scott herself, but she is a Broadway actress who shares much of Scott’s persona. The bulk of the 100-minute running time is taken up with this character – her interaction with prison personnel, her initial fear of her students (which is presented humorously), her conversations with her friends and co-workers in the theater and with her husband about her experience in the class, and one odd scene talking about prisons with a comically cautious Hillary Clinton, whom she meets through her hairdresser. (Chris Myers portrays Clinton, just one of his five stand-out portrayals, which include one of the inmates, the volunteer’s young son, and a nun.)

The volunteer is not presented as a saint; there is a revelation, hinted at early on, that she has a crime in her own past, for which she is teaching as part of her sentence of community service. But she is made the center, the character with the funny bits, the one with whom the audience is expected to identify. Even after we get down to business – the monologues the inmates create about their lives — the play’s focus soon shifts to the volunteer’s decision to write a play for an outside audience that incorporates the inmates’ stories, with some characters debating the ethics of doing this. One could most charitably call this meta noodling a fresh take on a prison drama; one of Scott and Scanlan’s aims, Scott explained in a recent interview, was to explore “prisons of all kinds that were happening around us—prisons of race, of sex, of sexuality, of marriages, of work, people’s own emotional prisons.”  Even if that aim were more effectively realized in the finished play, turning other people’s difficult lives into a metaphorical lesson for your personal growth can, to put it uncharitably, smack of slick self-indulgence.

The approach strikes me as less than ideal, because the stories the inmates tell on the stripped-down stage deserve to be heard. They are moving precisely to the extent that they are unpolished. Rick (Nicholas Christopher) tells the story of seeing his friend attack a prison official because the official wouldn’t let him attend his mother’s funeral – and how this awful moment persuaded Rick to stop getting high. Jeffrey (Chris Myers) offers his monologue about his mother’s discovery that she was HIV positive. Bey (Donald Webber Jr., who also does an effective turn as the female warden) recalls how as a four-year-old in the South, a local sheriff handcuffed him, apparently as a joke. “Years later, this memory hits me. In my cell, trying to make sense of it. I’ve been in prison for 20 years. I shot a cop. Was it fate?” Many of the stories that the characters have shaped into monologues, as their assignment for the volunteer’s class, “Theatricalizing the Personal Narrative,” are not explicitly about criminal life or prison life, and that is a large part of their appeal, and the most memorable point of the play. That point is underscored by the play’s title. While taking her prints, a prison guard (Derrick Baskin), who seems to be something of a palm reader, notices that the volunteer has six whorls on her hands, which is unusual, and that one is almost inside a loop; if it were inside the loop, he says, that would have been a Peacock’s Eye. People who have a Peacock Eye, he says, are characterized as “loyal, loving, trustworthy, capable of extreme acts of kindness” – AND “also manipulative, amoral, narcissistic, sociopathic with criminal tendencies.” The volunteer insists she has a Peacock’s Eye, and that you can’t have both good and bad characteristics at the same time; “it’s either/or.” By the end of the play, she learns that you can.

What’s good about “Whorl Inside a Loop,” especially the acting, would make its self-indulgent aspects matter less, if the show weren’t entering a theatrical landscape already dotted with well-done prison dramas, most notable among them plays created and performed by ex-inmates. “The Bullpen”, a solo show by former inmate Joseph Assadourian portraying 18 characters, will complete a year-long Off-Broadway run Saturday at the Playroom Theater. Another play, “The Castle,” features four members of the Fortune Society, a service and advocacy organization for the formerly incarcerated, who tell their own life stories. That play ran Off-Broadway at New World Stages for about a year, and has been performed continuously in schools, prisons, and courthouses ever since. Even “Orange Is The New Black,” the Netflix series which began three seasons ago as an adaptation of the memoir by ex inmate Piper Kerman, has moved beyond the safe, supposedly crowd-pleasing choice to center its drama around a good-looking, upper middle class blonde.

Whorl Inside A Loop

At Second Stage Theater

Written by Dick Scanlan and Sherie Rene Scott

With additional material by Milton Jones, Andre Kelley, Marvin Lewis, Felix Macado, Richard Norat, and Jeffrey Rivera.

Directed by Michael Mayer and Dick Scanlan

Cast: Derrick Baskin (Sunnyside), Nicholas Christopher (Rick), Chris Myers (Jeffrey), Ryan Quinn (Source), Sherie Rene Scott, Daniel J. Watts (Flex), Donald Webber, Jr. (Bey)

Runtime: 100 minutes with no intermission

Tickets: $64 to $125

Broadway Poll: Which Fall 2015 Show Most Excites You?

Below are a list of 18 shows scheduled to open on Broadway from September 2015 to January, 2016, organized chronologically by opening date.  Pick the one that most excites you. For information on the shows, see my Broadway Fall 2015 preview guide

Love and Money Review: A.R. Gurney’s New Play About A Feisty Rich WASP

 Maureen Anderman Gabriel Brown


Maureen Anderman
Gabriel Brown

“Love and Money,” A.R. Gurney’s latest comedy about WASPs, is as deep as dust, and no more solid, but as dust goes, it’s a fine light powder, ground by a craftsman who’s been at it for some four decades, and it’s more likely to tickle than to irritate.

In a brownstone on the Upper East Side, Cornelia Cunningham (Maureen Anderman) is packing up for a move to a fancy retirement community that she insists on calling a nursing home. At the same time, she is writing checks with a lot of zeroes; she has decided to give away all her considerable wealth to charity.

This does not sit well with her longtime law firm, which sends over Harvey (Joe Paulik), a young lawyer who might have better luck than her usual attorney in making her see reason. He introduces himself.

Cornelia: And your specialty is difficult old ladies?
Harvey: My specialty is Trusts and Estates.
Cornelia: I once knew a lawyer whose specialty was Murders and Impositions.
Harvey: I think you mean Mergers and Acquisitions, Mrs. Cunningham.

 Eventually, Harvey gets to the point: She might have trouble giving away all her money to charity, because her two grandchildren could contest it (her two children are dead.) And, Harvey says, his firm just received a registered letter from somebody claiming to be her third grandchild. Shortly after Harvey’s announcement, the young man suddenly appears at the brownstone, having traveled all the way from his and Cornelia’s (and Gurney’s) hometown of Buffalo. Walker Williams (Gabriel Brown) turns out to be African-American; he claims his father had a secret affair with Cornelia’s daughter.

Harvey is convinced that Walker is a con man, and frankly, any sensible theatergoer would share Harvey’s skepticism, even those who haven’t seen John Guare’s “Six Degrees of Separation.” Gurney does little to eliminate our suspicions. Walker’s evidence is flimsy, his explanations are full of holes, he is well spoken to the point of slickness, and he is upfront about his interest in money – he says he’s normally called Scott, a nickname his high school teacher gave him because of his love for F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby.”

Scott: Fitzgerald was a great writer.
Cornelia: I’ll tell you this, my friend. He loved to write about money.
Scott: That’s exactly why I went for the guy. That’s why my teacher called me Scott.
Cornelia: Because you like money too?
Scott: I do. I go for it big time.

Without our willingness to believe Scott’s claim of familial connection, the plot of “Love and Money” is something of a bust. More fruitful is the theme – that money is a curse — one , Cornelia says, “that specifically affects my particular tribe,” by which she means White Anglo-Saxon Protestants (At one point, she agrees with Harvey’s suggestion that she’s a “self-hating WASP.”) It’s because of their wealth, Cornelia maintains, that both her children died young, and that both her grandchildren are spoiled. The stories she tells to back up her assertion (with the aid of her blunt-speaking long-time maid, Agnes) sometimes persuasively buttress her argument; sometimes they feel like a stretch. In either case, they offer little new nor especially insightful.

Gurney could also easily be accused of handling the issue of race too glibly:

Scott: Are you mad she had a major love affair with a black man?
Cornelia: Mad? I’m thrilled! And jealous! The closest I’ve ever come to an affair with a black man is to vote for Obama.

Yet if “Love and Money” is trivial, it is also convivial. The clue to how we’re supposed to take this play is in the couple of suave, bubbly Cole Porter songs Gurney somewhat oddly works into the show (Cornelia is giving away her piano to Juilliard, and a student, Jessica, comes by to try it out.) Anderman is delightful as what used to be called a character, somebody easily mistaken for dotty, but who has actually become wiser and more open-minded with the years, and more willing to speak her mind.

At one point, Cornelia holds up a waste paper basket that looks like an elephant’s foot. “This was originally owned and operated by a majestic African elephant. It was shot by my late husband on his last hunting trip.” She uses the waste basket as a reminder of mankind’s cruelty to animals. Michael Yeargan’s meticulous set design is matched by Gurney’s precision with the English language. Both make the play fun to take in from moment to moment, even though those moments don’t ultimately add up to one of the playwright’s best works.

As I wrote in a profile of A.R. Gurney last year, “Love and Money” is the final, and only new, play in Gurney’s year of residency at the Signature Center, which coincided with a Broadway revival of his “Love Letters,” after the playwright’s 25-year absence from The Great White Way.  Quick to follow is the revival of his “Sylvia,” which when it opens on October 15th will be only the fifth production on Broadway by this author of some 50 plays. At age 84, Gurney has lived to see his work, and his reputation, dusted off and presented anew.


Love and Money

The Alice Griffin Jewel Box Theatre at The Pershing Square Signature Center (480 West 42nd Street between 9th and 10th Avenues)
by A.R. Gurney
Directed by Mark Lamos
Michael Yeargan (Scenic Design), Jess Goldstein (Costume Design), Stephen Strawbridge (Lighting Design), John Gromada (Sound Design).
Cast: Maureen Anderman as Cornelia Cunningham, Gabriel Brown as Walker “Scott” Williams, Pamela Dunlap as Agnes Munger, Kahyun Kim as Jessica Worth and Joe Paulik as Harvey Abel.
Running time: 75 minutes with no intermission
Tickets: $25 until September 27; $55 after
Love and Money is scheduled to run until October 4, 2015

#Ham4Ham Expands. Hedwig Halts. #Desnudas Daunt. New Season Stings. Week in New York Theater

SpringAwakeningHam4Ham#Ham4Ham, the name for the five-minute performances during the lottery drawings for the Broadway musical Hamilton, began last month with Lin-Manuel Miranda rapping, and roping in other cast members. Now, cast members from other Broadway shows are guest starring – Les Miz, Spring Awakening, Fun Home. Is this the birth of a new theatrical…genre?

In the Heights Reunion

Les Miserables

Spring Awakening

Fun Home

(#Ham4Ham is hip shorthand for the lottery because the winners pay only ten dollars — Hamilton is the face on the ten dollar bill — to see the musical Hamilton.)

BroadwayWeek2015

Broadway Week

Week in New York Theater Reviews

"Informed Consent" at Primary Stages
My review of Informed Consent

At a time when it seems that every other new TV series (Extant, Humans, Mr. Robot, Fear the Walking Dead) can be read as a cautionary tale about the dangers of science and technology, “Informed Consent” offers a more sophisticated look at a whole host of issues raised by its specific scientific focus. The play makes an impressive attempt to present each side of the dispute with respect. It also gives us a glimpse into the implications of the extraordinary advances in genome research — what our DNA can tell us about our history and, increasingly, our future….But for all the fascination inherent in the subject, playwright Deborah Zoe Laufer and director Liesl Tommy’s approach undermines the story in two major ways.

Full review of Informed Consent

MercuryFur1

My review of Mercury Fur

The horrific future conjured in “Mercury Fur” – a world piled high with atrocities ranging from the killing of zoo animals to random decapitations to child torture – is clearly meant to shock. But what is unexpected in the New Group’s revival of Philip Ridley’s 2005 dystopian fantasy is how tedious it is.

Full review of Mercury Fur

Week in New York Theater News

‪Hedwig and the Angry Inch is‪ closing September 13, after 22 previews,506 regular performances, and six Hedwigs ‬

The Painted Ladies of Times Square

desnudas

Although there is more nudity on Broadway stages than on Broadway, the mayor and the police commissioner, goaded by several days of front-page headlines in the Daily News, are determined to do something about the dozen or so women who call themselves #Desnudas and parade around in the Times Square plazas wearing little more than body paint.
“I’d prefer to dig the whole damn thing up and put it back the way it was”-NYPD Commissioner Bratton on Times Square pedestrian plazas

New York Theatre Workshop will offer tickets for $25  for the first two performances of every show, starting September 11 with Elevator Repair Service’s Fondly Collette Richland.

paramourlogo

 

It’s conquered Vegas and the world, now Cirque de Soleil plans to take over Broadway’s Lyric (where On The Town is running until September 6), with a new show called “Paramour,” which opens in June. Cirque’s description of its show, in true carnival barker tradition:

Paramourtext

 

Hold On To Me Darling, a new Kenneth Lonergan play about a country-western star who tries to give up his fame, will be at the Atlantic Theater in February.

Desire

Six playwrights, including John Guare and Beth Henley,  dramatize Tennessee Williams short stories in Desire, the first play of ‪the 59E59 season. It opens September 10.

RussellTovey

Joining the cast of A View from the Bridge on Broadway: ‪Looking’s ‪Russell Tovey as Rodolpho. It opens Nov 12.

MTCseason
New MTC Season Provokes Protest

Fool For Love by Sam Shepard, October 8 to December 6
Sam Rockwell and Nina Arianda
Two lovers holed up in a seedy motel on the edge of the Mojave Desert (

Ripcord by David Lindsay-Abaire, opens October 20
Holland Taylor, Marylouise Burke, and Rachel Dratch. David Hyde Pierce directs
Two rivals vie for a choice room in an assisted living facility

Important Hats of the 20th Century by Nick Jones, opens November 25
Directed by Moritz Von Stuelpnagel (Hand to God)
a cutthroat rivalry between milliners in 1930s New York.

Our Mother’s Brief Affair by Richard Greenberg, opens January 20
Linda Lavin. Directed by MTC artistic director Lynne Meadow
A woman makes a startling confession on her deathbed.

Prodigal Son by John Patrick Shanley, opens February 9
Robert Sean Leonard. Shanley directs
A brilliant, troubled young man from the Bronx at a New Hampshire private school.

The Father by Florian Zeller, opens Apr. 12
Frank Langella. Directed by Doug Hughes
A trip through the mind of a man who may be a retired dancer or an engineer, and who may be visited by family or by strangers

Incognito by Nick Payne, Opens May 24
The stories of a pathologist, a seizure patient, and a neuropsychologist intertwine mysteriously.

When this season was announced, there was much criticism on social media about its lack of diversity

 

 

– which was picked up by the New York Times.

“These are really respected artists,”Zakiyyah Alexander, a member of the Kilroys, was quoted as saying. “It’s not their fault that they have been put in the position to only be surrounded by white male playwrights.”

 

MTC added an eighth show to their season:
The Ruins of Civilization by Penelope Skinner, with Lila Neugebauer slated to direct.

 

I’d like to end on a personal note

 

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