October 2014 Openings Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off-Off Broadway

Some of the shows opening in October. Click on any photograph to see it enlarged.

October is one of the three busiest theater months in New York, with some 40 shows opening sometime this month on Broadway,  Off-Broadway or Off-Off Broadway. This comes to at least one for each day of the month, although the schedule is more chaotic than that.  Below is a list, organized chronologically by opening date, with descriptions of some that look promising or have gotten attention – but nothing can be guaranteed in advance (which is why I review.)

* Asterisks are next to those shows to which I have been invited (and plan) to review as of this writing. 

Color key: Broadway: Red*. Off Broadway: Black or Blue. Off Off Broadway: Green.

October 1, 2014

Tail!Spin! (Lynn Redgrave Theater at Culture Project)

*King Lear (NYU Skirball Center for Performing Arts)

 October 2

*The Country House (Samuel J. Friedman Theatre) 

Blythe Danner stars in an adaptation by Donald Margulies (Dinner With Friends) of Chekhov’s The Seagull focuses on a family of thespians who gather in a house in the Berkshires during the Williamstown theater festival.

Riding The Midnight Express with Billy Hayes (Barrow Street Theatre)

Port Authority (DR2 Theatre)

October 4

Sleepy Hollow (The Players Theatre)

October 5

*The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Barrymore Theatre)

Fifteen-year-old Christopher, clinically awkward and brilliant, is suspected of killing the neighbor’s dog. He sets out on a life-changing journey to find the culprit.

This stage adaptation of a peculiarly-written novel I loved by Mark Haddon was well-received in London, winning 7 Olivier Awards (equalling the previous record-breaking Matilda.) It was especially praised for its design. The director and the designers are the same on Broadway, it is still a Royal National Theatre production, but the cast is different

October 7

The Killing of Sister George (TACT at the Beckett)

October 8

Jewish Chronicles (Soho Playhouse)

October 9

*It’s Only A Play (Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre)

The cast of a show called “The Golden Egg” await the reviews in this revival of Terrence McNally’s 1982 comedy, which is likely to be most appreciated for its cast — especially the reunited duo Matthew Broderick and Nathan Lane, as well as the Broadway debut of Harry Potter veteran Rupert Grint.

October 11

Lying (Interart Theater)

October 12

*While I Yet Live (Primary Stages)

Kinky Boots star Billy Porter turns playwright, writing about his family in Pittsburgh.

Generations (WalkerSpace)

October 13

Jacuzzi (Ars Nova Theater)

October 14

Found (Atlantic Theater Company)

Sweet, Sweet Spirit Three (The Theater at the 14th Street Y)

October 15

Lennon: Through a Glass Onion (Union Square Theatre)

Going Once, Laughing Twice (St. Luke’s)

October 16

*On The Town (Lyric Theatre)

Three sailors spend a day on leave in New York City, meeting some great dames in a revival of the musical by Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden and Adolph Green.

I have high hopes for this production, which features great choreography by Joshua Bergasse (based on the glimpses we’ve been given, in videos, in reports from pre-Broadway tryouts, and at Broadway in Bryant Park), and such standards as “New York, New York (It’s a Wonderful Town)” “Come Up to My Place” and “Lonely Town,” as well as some jazzy surprises like “I Can Cook Too.”

Powwow Highway (HERE Arts Center)

October 19

The Belle of Amherst (Westside Theatre)

My Son the Waiter, a Jewish Tradgedy (Triad Theatre)

Excuse My Dust (SoHo Playhouse)

October 20

Brownsville Song (b-side for tray) (LCT’s Claire Tow Theater)

Billy & Ray (Vineyard Theatre)

That’s film director Billy Wilder and novelist Raymond Chandler: The play, written by Mike Bencivenga and directed by Garry Marshall (Happy Days, etc.),  is about their contentious collaboration on the noir film based on Chandler’s novel, “Double Indemnity.” The four-member cast includes Vincent Kartheiser (Pete Campbell in “Mad Men”) as Wilder and Larry Pine as Chandler.

October 21

Deliverance (59E59)

James Dickey’s famous novel of a traumatic trip down a river in the South  is adapted by Sean Tyler

October 22

Fortress of Solitude (Public Theater)

Jonathan Lethem’s coming-of-age novel about 1970s Brooklyn is adapted by songwriter  Michael Friedman (Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson) and bookwriter Itamar Moses, and features an 18-member cast that includes  Kyle Beltran, Adam Chanler-Berat, and André De Shields.

October 23

*Disgraced (Lyceum Theatre)

Pakistani-American lawyer Amir and his white, artist wife Emily gives a dinner party that starts off friendly and turns ugly. The play, Akhtar’s first, was produced at Lincoln Center in 2012, winning the Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

Shatter (Urban Stages)

October 24

Miss Julie (Gene Frankel Theatre)

October 25

Hereafter Musical (The Snapple Theater Center)

October 26

The Last Ship (Neil Simon Theatre)

Gideon leaves his hometown to travel the world, returning 14 years later to discover that the love he left behind is engaged to somebody else, and the town’s shipbuilding industry is endangered. The show is said to be inspired by Sting’s own childhood experiences.

Shut Up, Sit Down and Eat (Snapple Theater Center)

The Brightness of Heaven (Cherry Lane Studio Theatre)

October 28

Lift (59E59)

Father Comes Home From The War 1,2, &3 (Public Theater)

October 29

Lips Together Teeth Apart (Second Stage)

October 30

The Real Thing (American Airlines Theatre)

Henry is a successful writer who is attempting to balance his professional and personal lives in this comedy about marriage and betrayal.

Ewan McGregor and Maggie Gyllenhaal are both making their Broadway debuts in this second Broadway revival of Stoppard’s play.

Click for a preview guides to the entire Broadway Fall 2014 Season and the Off-Broadway Fall 2014 Season.

*Grey with asterisks mean Broadway shows to which I’ve been invited past the opening.

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Indian Ink Review: Luminous Actresses Romola Garai and Rosemary Harris in Stoppard’s History/Art/Love Lesson

In “Indian Ink,” Tom Stoppard’s complex, challenging, beautifully acted and sometimes fascinating play about an Englishwoman in pre-independence India, Stoppard does something that surely not even the most intellectual of playwrights has ever achieved before on a New York stage – a living footnote.

“You mustn’t expect me to be Intelligence from Abroad,” Flora Crewe recites from the letter she is writing home to her sister about her trip in 1930. “You obviously know much more about the Salt March than I do.”

Just then Pike pops up to explain:

“Gandhi’s ‘March to Sea’ to protest the Salt Tax began at Ahmedabad on March 12th,” Pike tells us. “He reached the sea on the day this letter was written.”

This is Stoppard being theatrically playful again. Fear not, the footnotes don’t last the whole show – although there may be times you wish they did.

Eldon Pike is an English professor, hoping and planning to put together a biography of Miss Flora Crewe, the scandalous, tragic (and fictional) British poet that every schoolboy now studies. He is speaking to us a half century later, having first visited Miss Crewe’s surviving sister Eleanor Swan in England, then taken a trip to India himself to retrace Flora’s steps of 50 years earlier.

And so, the action on stage takes place on two continents a half-century apart simultaneously.

Click on any photograph to see it enlarged

 

“Indian Ink,” which has now opened at the Laura Pels, is receiving its New York premiere some 19 years after it was written, one of two Stoppard plays in the city this season, both produced by the Roundabout. “The Real Thing,” which opens on Broadway October 30th, is more accessible than this play in the Roundabout’s Off-Broadway theater. Part detective story, part love story, part history and geography lesson, “Indian Ink” is also an art lesson of sorts – there is some engrossing conversation about how Indian art differs from Western art – as well as a meditation on the nature of history and biography…how much can we be certain about the past?

All of this would surely be more easily dismissed as too obscure (and the play’s three hour length too much to take in) were it not for the presence of the delectable Romola Garai as Flora and the always-luminous Rosemary Harris as her no-nonsense sister Mrs. Swan.

Flora is the quintessential modern woman of the 1920’s, a beauty whose past precedes her, even to India, where the residents of Jummapur know or soon find out about her having modeled in the nude for Modigliani – a painting that Flora’s fiancé burned (thus becoming her ex-fiance) – as well as her having been tried in British court for obscenity for her first book of poems: “The magistrate asked me why all the poems seemed to be about sex, and I said, ‘Write what you know’ — just showing off; I was practically a virgin…” Garai establishes Flora as lively but credibly naïve as we watch while she meets with an Indian painter Nirad Das (Firdous Bamji), for whom she poses; with a British officer David Durance (Lee Aaron Rosen) with whom she goes horseback riding for the first time in her life; and with the Rajah of Jummapur(Rajeev Varma)who takes her on a tour of his vast automobile collection. What Pike wants to know – and let’s face it, the audience too – did these meetings become dalliances?

“Men were not really important to Flora. If they had been, they would have been fewer,” Flora’s sister Mrs. Swan tells Nirad Das’ son, Anish Das (Bhavesh Patel.) “She used them like batteries. When things went flat, she’d put in a new one.”

Rosemary Harris, a veteran of the New York stage going back more than 60 years, knows how to deliver a line like this, which gets one of the largest laughs in the show.

These two terrific actresses, one who will be new to most New York theatergoers, the other much beloved by us, get terrific support from the rest of the 15-member cast, and by a design team helps us understand the allure of India. Robert Wierzel’s lighting in particular is gorgeous.

Those familiar with Stoppard’s work will recognize the meticulously imagined worlds, the intellectual explorations, the theatrical ambushes, the sly chuckles; the humor as well as the insight come in this play largely from the culture clash/accommodation between India and the people who colonized it. They will also understand the fortitude this over-long play sometimes requires. But those patient enough to stay attentive may be in for another surprise; by the end, subtly, “Indian Ink” is quite moving.

Indian Ink

Laura Pels Theater

by Tom Stoppard

Directed by Carey Perloff, scenic design by Neil Patel, costume design by Candice Donnelly, lighting design by Robert Wierzel

Cast:

Firdous Bamji (Nirad Das),  Bill Buell (Englishman), Nick Choksi (Dilip), Romola Garai (Flora Crewe), Rosemary Harris (Eleanor Swan), Neal Huff (Eldon Pike), Caroline Lagerfelt (Englishwoman), Omar Maskati (Nazrul), Tim McGeever (Resident), Brenda Meaney (Nell), Philip Mills (Eric Swan), Ajay Naidu (Coomaraswami),Bhavesh Patel (Anish Das), Lee Aaron Rosen (David Durnance), Rajeev Varma (Rajah/Politician)

 Running time: 3 hours including a 15 minutes intermission.

Tickets: $79

 

Indian Ink is set to run through November 30.

New York Theater September 2014 Quiz. Special Playwrights Edition

How well were you paying attention to the theater news in September? Answer these 10 questions, mostly involving playwrights, and find out.

Stalking The Bogeyman Review: Revenging Childhood Rape

At the age of seven, David Holthouse was raped by his teenage neighbor. Twenty-five years later, he decided to kill the man – both to avenge the crime, and to prevent any more from occurring.

Holthouse, a journalist, gave a first-person account of this true story in 2004 for the newspaper where he was working at the time, Westword. In 2011, it was turned into a segment on the radio program This American Life. And now, it’s a play Off-Broadway at New World Stages.

Markus Potter heard David Holthouse’s This American Life podcast on his car radio and was so overwhelmed he had to pull his car over. As both adapter and director, Potter has created a production that is impeccable in its stagecraft – paradoxically, too impeccable.

Click on any photograph to enlarge it

David Goldstein’s set is elaborately detailed, flexible and imposing; lighting designer Cory Pattak and sound designer and composer Erik T. Lawson provide clarity and enhance the drama for events that take place in Anchorage, Phoenix and Denver, from 1978 to 2004.

“Stalking The Bogeyman” has a cast of six fine actors,  experienced Broadway veterans, portraying the two antagonists and their parents. Roderick Hill persuasively plays David Holthouse as both a young child and a troubled adult. John Herrera is especially impressive in his various roles as the Bogeyman’s father, a would-be molesting little league baseball coach, and the gang leader Holthouse interviewed for an article to whom he returns to buy a gun. Erik Heger manages to turn the Bogeyman into a human being.

That last fact is a clue to the problem. For all the theatrical talent that goes into this production, “Stalking The Bogeyman” would have worked better as a solo show. Part of what makes Holthouse’s accounts so riveting is not just the unfolding of the story – we want to know what happens next – but his honesty in telling this true story, his bravery in revealing his own complicated feelings, and also the shifting of his perceptions. It makes complete sense that David would turn his rapist into “the bogeyman,” who haunted his sleeping and waking hours until their dramatic confrontation. But it’s something else again for the character to be listed as “The Bogeyman” in the program. He doesn’t look like the bogeyman; on stage, he’s just a guy – a handsome young actor. By removing the single (and singular) interior perspective, by making everything literal and external, “Stalking the Bogeyman” removes some of the horror, and perhaps some of the insight as well.

Stalking The Bogeyman

New World Stages 5 (340 West 50th Street)

Adapted and directed by Markus Potter, original story by David Holthouse. Additional writing by Shane Zeigler, Shane Stokes , Santino Fontana.

Scenic design by David Goldstein, costume design by Tristan Raines, lighting design by Cory Pattak, sound design and original music by Erik T. Lawson

Cast: Roderick Hill (David Holthouse), Eric Heger (The Bogeyman), Kate Levy (Nancy Holthouse), Murphy Guyer (Robert Holthouse, Emmit), John Herrera (Russ Crawford, Payaso, Coach Billy), Roxanne Hart (Carol Crawford, Dr. Sarah Leavitt)

Running time: 80 minutes with no intermission

Tickets: $79

 

You Can’t Take It With You Broadway Review

Annaleigh Ashford

Annaleigh Ashford

“Your family and mine … it just wouldn’t work.”
Alice, the most normal member of the eccentric Sycamore family in the old-fashioned crowd-pleasing comedy “You Can’t Take It With You,” is talking to the man she loves, explaining why she can’t marry him.
“Everybody’s got a family,” Tony protests.
“But not like mine,” Alice says.
Actually, in the 78 years since Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman debuted their comedy on Broadway – a show for which words like wacky and zany and madcap were surely coined — there have been many, many such families, including many Sycamores: The production directed by Scott Ellis that has now opened at the Longacre with a cast of 20 led by James Earl Jones is the sixth on Broadway. An Oscar-winning 1938 film version directed by Frank Capra with a cast led by Jimmy Stewart and Lionel Barrymore pops up all the time. But, most to the point, the show’s characters and plot have clearly inspired everything from The Addams Family to La Cage Aux Folles to Arrested Development — and arguably, one way or another, every other “family” sitcom on TV.

Still, one can see this Broadway revival as especially well-timed, coming just a few months after Lincoln Center’s stage adaptation of Moss Hart’s memoir “Act One.”
That memoir focused on Hart’s first big hit with George S. Kaufman, “Once in a Lifetime,” which opened on Broadway in 1930. Six years and several collaborations later, their “You Can’t Take It With You” was deemed by critic Brooks Atkinson “a much more spontaneous piece of hilarity…written with a dash of affection to season the humor…” The comedy won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

If the humor is more familiar now, “You Can’t Take It With You” is in the hands of a first-rate director, who has assembled a meticulous team of designers, added original music by Jason Robert Brown, and cast some wonderful performers to blow things up — sometimes literally.

Click on any photograph to see it enlarged

James Earl Jones is Grandpa, who decided some 35 years ago, to stop working and start enjoying life. He keeps a collection of snakes, and spends his days attending circuses and college commencements. He also has not paid any income tax since 1914, when the United States started collecting it.
His daughter Penelope (Kristine Nielsen, so wonderful in Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike) has written plays for the last eight years, ever since a typewriter was delivered to the Sycamore household by mistake, with two live kittens as companions, and a skull that pivots open as a container for her candy. It is a clue to the manic quality of the events to follow that she’s named her two kittens Groucho and Harpo.
Penelope’s husband Paul (Mark Linn-Baker) spends night and day creating fireworks, which provide some lively punctuation to each of the three acts of the play. Their daughter Essie (stand-out Annaleigh Ashford, from Kinky Boots and Masters of Sex) spends most of her day practicing her dancing, to hilarious effect, often to the accompaniment of her husband Ed (Will Brill) who plays the xylophone.
The household is far from a nuclear one, however (unless you are describing their level of energy), for there are various hangers-on whose connection to the Sycamore residence we learn only in passing. Mr. DePinna (Patrick Kerr), for example, helps Paul with his fireworks; he was delivering the ice to the Sycamores eight years ago, and never left. The priceless Julie Halston portrays a drunken actress that Penelope the playwright has dragooned into the household to read one of her plays.

This is the household that Penelope’s other daughter, the straitlaced Alice (Rose Byrne from Bridemaids, making her Broadway debut) fears is too much of a handful for Tony Kirby (Fran Kranz), a junior Wall Street executive, and his family.  That there will be sparks is never in doubt. But the look on the face of Mrs. Kirby (Johanna Day) as she regards the eccentricities of her future in-laws is unmatched — except maybe by the double-take by Elizabeth Ashley, who plays the deposed  Grand Duchess Olga Katrina, working as a waitress at Child’s Restaurant. I see I left out the G-men and Russian revolutionaries, and the dance master Boris Kolenkhov (Reg Rogers) who thinks everything stinks.

“Art is only achieved through perspiration,” Kolenkhov declares.

“Yes,” Grandpa concedes, “but it helps if you’ve got a little talent with it.” It helps even more, as Moss Hart, George S. Kaufman and the creative team behind this production demonstrate, if you have a lot.

You Can’t Take It With You

At Longacre Theater

Written by: George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart

Directed by Scott Ellis, scenic design by David Rockwell, costume design by Jane Greenwood, lighting design by Donald Holder, sound design by Jon Weston, original music by Jason Robert Brown

Cast: James Earl Jones, Kristine Nielsen, Rose Byrne, Annaleigh Ashford, Elizabeth Ashley, Mark Linn-Baker, Crystal A. Dickinson, Julie Halston, Byron Jennings, Marc Damon Johnson, Patrick Kerr, Reg Rogers, Will Brill, Fran Kranz, Johanna Day, Nick Corley, Austin Durant, Joe Tapper, Barrett Doss, Ned Noyes, Pippa Pearthree

Running time: 2 hours and 15 minutes, including two ten minute intermissions

Tickets: $37.00 – $152.00

You Can’t Take It With You is scheduled to run through January 4, 2015

20 Most Produced Playwrights. What Theater Job Is Right For You? The Week in New York Theater

BroadwaymapDuffyScquare

Above is a rare look at the map of the Broadway theaters in the sidewalk of Father Duffy Square, rarely visible through all the feet covering it.

Below are links to the entire broadcast of Sweeney Todd, and my reviews of The Money Shot, Scenes From A Marriage, Love Letters and This Is Our Youth; and a flow chart to help you decide what theater career is the right one.

 

The Week in New York Theater, Sept 22-28

 

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CircleofLifefromLionKing

Disney has made a record $6.2 billion from its worldwide stage productions of The

Lion King, surpassing Phantom of The Opera, a decade older.

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS

Jill Paice, Veanne Cox (!), Max von Essen join Robert Fairchild  and Leanne Michelle Cope in the cast of An American In Paris, opening on Broadway April 12th.

Money Shot, The Lucille Lortel Theatre

My  review of The Money Shot

In “The Money Shot,” a comedy by Neil LaBute whose humor rests largely on the playwright’s contempt for the two Hollywood couples he has created, it takes more than an hour for the audience to learn the reason why the characters are meeting. Steve (Fred Weller) and Karen (Elizabeth Reaser) are both movie stars who have gotten together with their spouses in Karen’s home in the Hollywood Hills above L.A. to discuss the request their director has made – that they have sex together for real in their forthcoming film…

This thin premise has led to a marketing campaign by MCC Theater (showing the four performers in bed) that is at best misleading. This is not a play about sex; it’s about revenge — the revenge of yet another playwright who is sticking it to Hollywood. “The Money Shot” is an obvious and poisonous if intermittently entertaining play that is mostly taken up with verbal jousting, though it does climax in a lengthy wrestling match. A first-rate cast does what it can to create characters out of LaBute’s easy targets and unappealing caricatures.

Full review of The Money Shot

All three pairs of Johans and Mariannes

All three pairs of Johans and Mariannes

My review of Scenes From A Marriage

Thrilled at intermission by the new stage adaptation of Ingmar Bergman’s “Scenes from A Marriage,” I poured out my enthusiasm about director Ivo van Hove’s unusual staging to my ex, whom I had brought along. To my surprise, my ex felt differently, dismissing the show with a terse epithet: “White people’s problems.”

Ah, relationships: Why are they so difficult?

That’s the question Bergman seems to have been exploring when he created the story of the marriage between a professor named Johan and a lawyer named Marianne as a Swedish TV mini-series in 1973…

von Hove does something that both confuses and (in my view) enhances the narrative.

Full review of Scenes From A Marriage

Blessed Unrest, performing at the 10th annual New York Independent Theatre Awards

Blessed Unrest, performing at the 10th annual New York Independent Theatre Awards

New York Innovative Theatre Awards 2014: Off-Off Broadway’s Best

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John Lahr’s three favorite playwrights “for show of emotion…psychological nuance” etc.: Anton Chekhov, Tennessee Williams, August Wilson. Lahr’s favorite theater books: Elia Kazan’s “A Life”; “Odets: American Playwright.”; Michael Blakemore’s “Stage Blood”

 Writing for Disability:

It’s worthwhile,says playwright Christopher Shinn, to cast performers who are portraying their own experience, whether race or disability

Making a disability non-exceptional on stage – rather than a subject of pity/wonder/fetish – is empowering, says Samuel Yates

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Integrating the arts into the regular curriculum causes students to be happier, score higher.

10 most produced plays of 2014-15,  according to American Theatre Magazine (surveying the nation-wide membership of their parent organization TCG):

• Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike by Christopher Durang:
• Outside Mullingar by John Patrick Shanley
• Bad Jews by Joshua Harmon
• Other Desert Cities by Jon Robin Baitz
• Around the World in 80 Days adapted from the novel by Jules Verne
• Peter and the Starcatcher, adapted by Rick Elice from Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson
• The Whipping Man by Matthew Lopez
• Tribes by Nina Raine
• 4000 Miles by Amy Herzog
• Into the Woods, book by James Lapine, music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
• Venus in Fur by David Ives

20 most produced playwrights after Shakespeare in the forthcoming season:
• Christopher Durang
• Sarah Ruhl (not including 1 adaptation)
• Neil Simon
• John Patrick Shaley
• Anton Chekhov
• Tarell Alvin McCraney
• Tom Stoppard
• Arthur Miller (not including 2 adaptations)
• August Wilson
• Amy Herzog
• Henrik Ibsen
• David Ives (not including 7 adaptations)
• James Lapine
• Sam Shepard
• Jon Robin Baitz
• Joshua Harmon
• Katori Hall
• Matthew Lopez
• Oscar Hammerstein
• Samuel D. Hunter
• Tennessee Williams

Not too surprisingly, Stephen Sondheim is the most-produced theater composer in the U.S., with 20 productions set for 2014-15.

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Dr. Zhivago, musical composed by Lucy Simon (Secret Garden) based on Pasternak novel, reportedly aiming for Broadway in April 2015.

It is currently in Sweden:

A lottery for free tickets to the first performance of every Public Theater show this season will be held via Today Tix app. You can also use Today Tix app to enter daily to win tickets to On The Town for only $20.

Brian Dennehy and Mia Farrow photo2 by Carol Rosegg

My review of Love Letters 

If there’s a gimmick to “Love Letters,” the Broadway revival of A.R. Gurney’s two-character play about a man and woman writing to one another over half a century, it isn’t the presence of a rotating roster of rarely-seen stars – Mia Farrow with Brian Dennehy through October 10th – nor the absence of scenery or costumes, nor that the actors stay seated at a table the whole time and read from scripts without ever looking at each other. It is that the two characters write letters to one another. Who does that anymore?

That is part of why this play holds such an unexpected fascination, helped along by a reliable performance by the formidable Dennehy and an extraordinary one by Mia Farrow. Part of the pleasure, much akin to Michael Apted’s documentary “Up” series, is in watching while a relationship and two lifetimes unfold before us, in ways that are suggested subtly from the start, and in ways that are totally surprising.

Full review

 

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Playwright Brighde Mullins on her road from Las Vegas casino shill to lover of Aristotle, and what they share

Tom Stoppard uses two main instruments to write his plays – the library, and a pen; no longer a quill 1; his last goose died, he says.

“Whatever else is going on in the world outside the theater, love and infidelity are always going on.” ~ Tom Stoppard

 

 

Which_role_are_you_Flow_diagram

 

Ian W. Hill@geminicollision And somehow everyone gets stuff done without techies (other than designers) or a Stage Manager? Impressive.

Jonathan Mandell @NewYorkTheater If you flow in all directions at once, you’re a stage manager.

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If you missed Sweeney Todd on PBS:

SweeneyToddPBS

http://video.pbs.org/viralplayer/2365329433

 

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This is Our Youth

This is Our Youth

My review of This Is Our Youth

The beauty and wonder of Lonergan’s play is that it depicts with unblinking specificity a group of foul-mouthed, pot-smoking, hyper-articulate but clueless rich kids on the Upper West Side in 1982. But the playwright somehow brings us inside those characters, with lots of humor and little judgment, so that the audience can freely identify with them – not “What have our youth come to?” but “Yeah, I’ve been there.”

Director Anne D. Shapiro, who won a Tony for “August: Osage County,” and did wonders with “The Motherfucker with the Hat,” here again teams up with scenic designer Todd Rosenthal to present a production of this three-character play suitable for an 1,100-seat Broadway house like the Cort, with largely positive results.

Full Review

This Is Our Youth Review: Michael Cera and Kiera Culkin Far From Avenue Q

ThisisOurYouthSaraKrulwich

Is this OUR Youth? His sister was murdered six years ago, his rich, abusive father has just kicked him out of the house, and 19-year-old Warren, portrayed by Michael Cera in the crackling Broadway debut production of Kenneth Lonergan’s 1996 play, drags a suitcase full of his vintage toy collection and $15,000 in cash that he has stolen from his Dad to the Upper West Side apartment of Dennis (Kieran Culkin), his 21-year-old drug dealer. Warren asks Dennis whether he can stay with him for a couple of days. Dennis tells him to go somewhere else, but there’s nowhere else to go. “Everyone’s parents are home,” Warren says. “I’m not allowed in their houses.”

“Nobody can stand to have you around. And you can’t get laid,” says Dennis, who calls Warren his friend.

This is far from Avenue Q, although both plays focus on bewildered people navigating the unnerving transition between childhood and life as an independent adult. Given the harshness of the characters’ attitudes and their recklessness, the title can sound admonishing – as if the playwright is asking us to join him in tut-tutting the anomie, aimlessness and self-destruction of an entire generation. But one monologue offers a clue to what the title, and the play, is really about. In a long self-justifying (and, one suspects, partly self-parodying) speech, Dennis defends to Warren his making a profit off his friends through his drug dealing. “I’m providing you schmucks with such a crucial service…Plus I’m providing you with precious memories of your youth, for when you’re fuckin’ old…. You’re going to remember your youth as like a gray stoned haze punctuated by a bunch of beatings from your Dad and, like, my jokes.” The title, in other words, is a statement from the characters.

The beauty and wonder of Lonergan’s play is that it depicts with unblinking specificity a group of foul-mouthed, pot-smoking, hyper-articulate but clueless rich kids on the Upper West Side in 1982. But the playwright somehow brings us inside those characters, with lots of humor and little judgment, so that the audience can freely identify with them – not “What have our youth come to?” but “Yeah, I’ve been there.”

Director Anne D. Shapiro, who won a Tony for “August: Osage County,” and did wonders with “The Motherfucker with the Hat,” here again teams up with scenic designer Todd Rosenthal to present a production of this three-character play suitable for an 1,100-seat Broadway house like the Cort, with largely positive results.  Rosenthal’s set, like that with Hat, opens up to suggest a wider city — there is an impressively realistic backdrop of the post-war apartment buildings that loom behind and above Dennis’s apartment. The characters’ rough-housing seems designed to fill up the stage.

All three performers are making their Broadway debuts, with little to no previous stage experience. Those who know and like Michael Cera from “Arrested Development” and “Juno” will be happy getting just about the same poker-faced, man-boy character in “This Is Your Youth,” although he is projecting his voice in a way that makes clear he is new to the stage. His interpretation seems narrower in range than Mark Ruffalo, the original Warren Straub (a role that began Ruffalo’s collaboration with Lonergan, which led to one of my favorite films, “You Can Count On Me.”) But Cera contributes a comic timing that lands every laugh, and a final touching moment that feels devastating.

Tavi Gevinson, who became a celebrity at age 12 because of her fashion blog, Style Rookie, is at age 18 (born the year “This Is Our Youth” debuted), impressive as a stage presence, holding her own with two movie veterans as Jessica Goldman, the object of Warren’s desire.  She has a horn of a voice, and a clear-cut future as a performer if she wants it, and her duet of attraction and anxiety with Cera certainly holds our attention, even if there is less in her character of an apparent interior life that a more experienced actress might have brought to the role.

As Dennis, Culkin delivers striking arias of bullying and bravado that mask the vulnerabilities he shares with his cowed pal.  It is a performance that makes you hope he will return (again and again) to the theater.

Not much seems to happen on stage in the course of the 48 hours when “This Is Our Youth” is supposed to take place. But the characters would consider what happens off-stage during that time cataclysmic- nothing less than the end of their youth.

 

This Is Our Youth

At Cort Theater

By Kenneth Lonergan

Directed by Anna D. Shapiro; sets by Todd Rosenthal; costumes by Ann Roth; lighting by Brian MacDevitt; sound by Rob Milburn and Michael Bodeen

Cast: Michael Cera (Warren Straub), Kieran Culkin (Dennis Ziegler) and Tavi Gevinson (Jessica Goldman).

Running time: 2 hours 20 minutes including one intermission.

This is Our Youth is scheduled to run through January 4th.

Love Letters Broadway Review: Mia Farrow and Brian Dennehy Over 50 Years

Brian Dennehy and Mia Farrow photo2 by Carol Rosegg

If there’s a gimmick to “Love Letters,” the Broadway revival of A.R. Gurney’s two-character play about a man and woman writing to one another over half a century, it isn’t the presence of a rotating roster of rarely-seen stars – Mia Farrow with Brian Dennehy through October 10th – nor the absence of scenery or costumes, nor that the actors stay seated at a table the whole time and read from scripts without ever looking at each other. It is that the two characters write letters to one another. Who does that anymore?

That is part of why this play holds such an unexpected fascination, helped along by a reliable performance by the formidable Dennehy and an extraordinary one by Mia Farrow. Part of the pleasure, much akin to Michael Apted’s documentary “Up” series, is in watching while a relationship and two lifetimes unfold before us, in ways that are suggested subtly from the start, and in ways that are totally surprising.

The history of this play has its own satisfactions, as I discovered when I interviewed the playwright. Gurney began it as a typing exercise when he was learning a new computer. Thinking it a short story, he sent it off to the New Yorker magazine. “They sent back a rejection, saying ‘we don’t publish plays.’ My agent said ‘Maybe it is a play.’”

Some early critic didn’t think so, but since 1988, “Love Letters” has been translated into 24 languages produced more than 40 countries. It is only one of three plays by the prolific playwright that have been on Broadway, and the only one to return.

The letter-writing begins in 1937, when Andrew Makepeace Ladd III formally accepts the invitation to Melissa Gardner’s second grade birthday party. Their personalities are established from the get-go, and become even clearer over time. He’s dutiful – stuffy — and taken with her from the start. She’s rebellious, ultimately self-destructive, and artistically talented. She accepts his attention, sometimes grudgingly, often as her due. Gurney exhibits an acute ear for how children and teenagers talk.

“Sometimes I think you just like me because I’m richer than you are,” Melissa writes to Andy.

“All I know is my mother keeps saying you’d make a good match; if I ever married you, I’d be set up for life,” Andy replies in the blunt way of a young teen. “But I think it’s really just physical attraction.”

Their milieu is Northeast upper class White Anglo Saxon Protestant – ballroom dancing and boarding schools; Ivy League universities, the Navy, and politics for him; gallery openings and discreet high-price sanitariums for her – but Gurney manages to capture this world so precisely that its inhabitants never feel foreign.

Mia Farrow in particular feels ideally cast; it’s hard to imagine somebody who would do a better job as Melissa Gardner (although I am willing to reappraise if and when I see the other performers.) Farrow, with her translucent beauty and educated diction, appears believably rooted in the upper crust enclave in which Melissa is raised, but which never serves her well. Farrow ranges from flighty to flirty to fragile, with a suggestion of great feeling – much of it all the more communicated, paradoxically, because it is not expressed on the surface.

For much of their lives, Andy and Melissa never seem to be in the right place in the right time for their friendship to turn into the romance that it seemed destined to become. “Love Letters” winds up being as much about loss as about love, and of discovering how small the space between them.

 

Love Letters

Brooks Atkinson Theater, 256 West 47th Street

By A. R. Gurney; directed by Gregory Mosher; sets by John Lee Beatty; costumes by Jane Greenwood; lighting by Peter Kaczorowski; sound by Scott Lehrer;

Running time: 1 hour 30 minutes.

Tickets: $60 to $136

 

Cast Brian Dennehy (Andrew Makepeace Ladd III) and Mia Farrow (Melissa Gardner).

 

Love Letters is scheduled to run through February 1, on the follow schedule of casts:

LoveLettersCast

Saturday, September 13, 2014, through Friday, October 10, 2014
Brian Dennehy and Mia Farrow
Saturday, October 11, 2014, through Friday, November 7, 2014
Carol Burnett and Brian Dennehy
Saturday, November 8, 2014 through Friday, December 5, 2014
Alan Alda and Candice Bergen
Saturday, December 6, 2014, through Friday, January 9, 2015
Stacy Keach and Diana Rigg
Saturday, January 10, 2015, through Sunday, February 1, 2015
Anjelica Huston and Martin Sheen

 

 

Scenes from A Marriage Review: Ingmar Bergman’s Intimate Masterpiece On Stage

Thrilled at intermission by the new stage adaptation of Ingmar Bergman’s “Scenes from A Marriage,” I poured out my enthusiasm about director Ivo van Hove’s unusual staging to my ex, whom I had brought along. To my surprise, my ex felt differently, dismissing the show with a terse epithet: “White people’s problems.”

Ah, relationships: Why are they so difficult?

That’s the question Bergman seems to have been exploring when he created the story of the marriage between a professor named Johan and a lawyer named Marianne as a Swedish TV mini-series in 1973. The show, which starred Liv Ullmann as Marianne and Erland Josephson as Johan, was edited down to a feature film that was presented around the world.

In one way, the English-language stage adaptation written by (McCarter Theater artistic director) Emily Mann at the New York Theatre Workshop is faithful to the series, which was divided into six episodes.

Click on any photograph to see it enlarged

The first act re-creates the first three episodes. In the scene that Bergman labeled “Innocence and Panic,”Johan and Marianne appear happily married, in contrast to the couple who are visiting them. But when that couple storm off after an argument, it turns out there are tensions. Marianne tells Johan she is pregnant again, and they discuss, in a painfully awkward way, whether to have the child or have another abortion. They both sound ambivalent. “It’s not unusual to want something and not want something at the same time,” Johan says.

In “The Art of Sweeping Things Under the Rug,” Marianne is angry – certainly at her mother, and his mother – but the targets for her anger are far wider, although she doesn’t quite understand what they are or why. “I don’t know what’s wrong with me. We love our work. We have good friends. What is it? We spend lots of time with the kids. We almost never fight. And when we do, we make sensible compromises we can both live with.”

In the third episode, “Paula,” Johann announces that he has fallen in love with another woman, and he is going to move out.

I lay these out in broad outline because von Hove does something that both confuses and (in my view) enhances the narrative. His ten-member cast includes three separate pairs of performers to portray Johan and Marianne, a different couple for each of these three first scenes. Then he has transformed the interior of the New York Theatre Workshop into three separate playing areas – one room for each scene. Each member of the audience is assigned to one of three groups. The first group is watching the first scene, while the second group is watching the second, and the third is watching the third. When one scene is over, each group of theatergoers moves to the next scene. In other words, Johan1 and Marianne1 play their scene, “Innocence and Panic” three times (to three difference audiences) in the first act.

This contrivance results in two discernible effects. I was in a group that saw the three scenes out of chronological order – the third scene first, then the first, then the second – which for theatergoers not already familiar with the story, requires some extra work. (The program offers no guidance other than to identify the Johans and Mariannes as 1, 2 and 3.)

But it also means that each scene plays to roughly 65 theatergoers, rather than all 200, which achieves a level of theatrical intimacy that seems exactly right for this drama of domestic intimacy. Even the confusion strikes me as thought-provoking and apt – we are forced to figure things out, just as the characters themselves seem uncertain about what’s going on with them.

This was what I was saying to myself in Act 2 after intermission, when the room dividers had been removed, and the entire audience was sitting together in a circle around the greatly enlarged stage watching all three pairs of Johans and Mariannes go at it, in a tumble of mix and match: Johan1 tells Marianne3 that he has broken up with Paula. All three Johans seduce all three Mariannes (although not necessarily the same Mariannes with whom they consorted in Act 1.) This seeming reconciliation deteriorates in the next scene, when the Johans bring bottles of wine and glasses, but the Mariannes carry briefcases full of divorce papers. They argue (all three performers for each character saying the lines in unison) and then break out into physical fighting all over the stage. Given the immensity of the playing area, and our seating arrangement around the perimeter, the scene induced a momentary feeling that we were the spectators at a gladiatorial contest.

There are challenges in the execution of van Hove’s aggressively conceptual approach. The scenes in the first act are constructed (with a common room in-between) in such a way that the audience for one scene can hear the louder noises and shouts from another. Perhaps this is a metaphor for the past and present bleeding into one another in any relationship, but it is also a distraction.

Then there is the issue of the various pairs of performers playing the couple. There was an obvious effort to cast actors of different ages, which offers at least a subliminal sense of a passage of time in the relationship. So Susannah Flood and Alex Hurt (Marianne1 and Johan1) appear to be in their early 30s, Roslyn Ruff and Dallas Roberts (Marianne2 and Johan2) in their 40s, and Tina Benko and Arliss Howard (Marianne3 and Johan3) in their 50s. But there is otherwise no apparent similarity in these performers. Now I wouldn’t expect the TV movie approach of getting performers who resemble one another physically to a frightening degree. But it is difficult to discern much similarity at all; is van Hove saying something with this choice? The couples seem to have various degrees of chemistry; the most effective in my view were Benko and Howard. This the director may have tacitly acknowledged by having them represent all the Johans and Mariannes in the final scenes — scenes that serve as something of an ironic, nuanced coda to a complicated relationship.

Scenes From a Marriage

2014 New York Innovative Theatre Awards: Off-Off Broadway’s Best

 

Blessed Unrest, performing at the 10th annual New York Independent Theatre Awards

Blessed Unrest, performing at the 10th annual New York Independent Theatre Awards

Here are the list of winners of the 10th annual New York Innovative Theatre Awards,   chosen from some 2,000 Off-Off Broadway (aka independent) productions.  Nominated this year were 130 individual artists, 58 different productions and 57 Off-Off-Broadway theater companies. (Winners have an *  beside their name and are in red)


Outstanding Ensemble

As You Like It, Happy Few Theatre Company
Ellen Adair, Nat Cassidy, Eric Gilde, Patrick Mulryan, Anna O’Donoghue,Christopher Seiler, Alexander Sovronsky

*At First Sight (and Other Stories), Broken Box Mime Company
Rebecca Baumwoll, Dinah Berkeley, Seikai Ishizuka, David Jenkins, Meera Kumbhani, Tasha Milkman, Marissa Molnar, Dan Reckart, Joe Tuttle, Leah Wagner

The Complete and Condensed Stage Directions of Eugene O’Neill Vol 2, New York Neo-Futurists
Cecil Baldwin, Christopher Borg, Roberta Colindrez, Cara Francis, Dylan Marron,Martina Potratz

Magic Bullets, Buran Theatre Company
Caitlin Bebb, Abigail Blueher, Donna Jewell, Jud Knudsen, Catrin Lloyd-Bollard, Erin Mallon, Michael McKim Karp, Kate Schroeder, Mari Yamamoto

Old Familiar Faces, Tin Drum Productions
Tandy Cronyn, Marianne Miller, James Patrick Nelson, Sam Tsoutsouvas

Pirira, Theatre 167
Adrian Baidoo, J.Stephen Brantley, Todd Flaherty, Flor De Liz Perez


Outstanding Solo Performance

Adam Boncz
Fatelessness, SceneHouse Productions and Gia Forakis & Company

J.Stephen Brantley
Chicken-Fried Ciccone: A Twangy True Tale Of Transformation, Hard Sparks

Aizzah Fatima
Dirty Paki Lingerie, Aizzah Fatima

Kim Katzberg
Darkling, Eat a Radish Productions in association with IRT Theater

*Sandy Moore
The Simple Stories, WorkShop Theater Company

Nora Woolley
Hip, Nora Woolley


Outstanding Actor in a Featured Role

*Noel Joseph Allain
Luft Gangster, Nylon Fusion Collective

Joshua Levine
Wild, Sanguine Theatre Company

Brendan McDonough
Beckett in Benghazi, Less Than Rent Theatre in association with Horse Trade Theater Group

Tony Naumovski
Sawbones & the Diamond Eater, Days of the Giants LLC

Lyonel Reneau
Wild, Sanguine Theatre Company

Dwayne Washington
Rent, The Gallery Players

Outstanding Actress in a Featured Role

Milee Bang
My Father’s Ashes, Original Binding Productions

Manna Nichols
Allegro, Astoria Performing Arts Center

Diana Oh
Frankenstein Upstairs, Gideon Productions

*Jenny Seastone
The Gin Baby, Kid Brooklyn Productions and Mermaid Sands Productions

Alyssa Simon
Within Arm’s Reach, Going to Tahiti Productions

Jenne Vath
Sawbones & the Diamond Eater, Days of the Giants LLC

Outstanding Actor in a Lead Role

Goran Ivanovski
The Lonesome West, Mark Forlenza Productions

James Patrick Nelson
Old Familiar Faces, Tin Drum Productions

*Jason O’Connell
Don Juan In Hell, Phoenix Theatre Ensemble

Tom Pavey
The Lonesome West, Mark Forlenza Productions

Brian Silliman
Dark Water, Manhattan Theatre Works (MTWorks)

J.Stephen Brantley
Pirira, Theatre 167

Outstanding Actress in a Lead Role

Debra Ann Byrd
The Importance of Being Earnest, Take Wing And Soar Productions, Inc.

Tandy Cronyn
Old Familiar Faces, Tin Drum Productions

*Heather E. Cunningham
An Appeal to the Woman of the House, Retro Productions

Christina Pumariega
Sousepaw: ‘A Baseball Story’, Shelby Company

Lesley Shires
The Gin Baby, Kid Brooklyn Productions

Hannah Sloat
The Glory of Living, Revolve Productions

Outstanding Choreography/Movement

Jim Cooney & Greg Zane
Nothing But Trash, Theater For The New City

Thiago Felix
Infinite While it Lasts, Group .BR

Grasshopper Mitch
David’s RedHaired Death, One Old Crow Productions

*Carlos Neto
Gymnos: A Geek’s Tragedy, Ticket 2 Eternity Productions

David Norwood & Rajendra Ramoon Maharaj
Salome: Da Voodoo Princess of Nawlins, Rebel Theater

Christine O’Grady
Allegro, Astoria Performing Arts Center

Outstanding Director

Kevin Augustine & Edward Einhorn
The God Projekt, La MaMa in association with Lone Wolf Tribe

Karen Case Cook
Don Juan In Hell, Phoenix Theatre Ensemble

Tyrus Holden
The Pregnancy of Angela Freak, AqUa MeRcUrY Creations

Kelly O’Donnell
Jane the Plain, Flux Theatre Ensemble

*DeLisa M. White
Lights Narrow, Teatro Oscuro

Tazewell Thompson
Sawbones & the Diamond Eater, Days of the Giants LLC

Outstanding Lighting Design

Joshua Benghiat
Pirira, Theatre 167

Joan Racho-Jansen
The Lonesome West, Mark Forlenza Productions

Evan Roby
The Cottage, Astoria Performing Arts Center

*Kia Rogers
Jane the Plain, Flux Theatre Ensemble

*Kia Rogers
The Gin Baby, Kid Brooklyn Productions and Mermaid Sands Productions

Alexandra Mannix
Within Arm’s Reach, Going to Tahiti Productions

 

Outstanding Costume Design

*Gail Cooper-Hecht
The Importance of Being Earnest, Take Wing And Soar Productions, Inc.

Sidney Fortner
A Man’s World, Metropolitan Playhouse

Amanda Jenks
Rubber Ducks and Sunsets, Ground Up Productions

Thomas Kleinert
The Pregnancy of Angela Freak, AqUa MeRcUrY Creations

Ryan Moller
The Cottage, Astoria Performing Arts Center

Carrie Robbins
Sawbones & the Diamond Eater, Days of the Giants LLC

Outstanding Set Design

Stephen Karoly Dobay
The Cottage, Astoria Performing Arts Center

Donald Eastman
The Chairs, La MaMa in association with Skysaver Productions

*Travis McHale
Rubber Ducks and Sunsets, Ground Up Productions

Brandon McNeel
Sawbones & the Diamond Eater, Days of the Giants LLC

Jacques Roy
And to the Republic, The Guerrilla Shakespeare Project

Tsubasa Kamaei & Jennifer Stimple Kamei
Don Juan In Hell, Phoenix Theatre Ensemble

Outstanding Sound Design

Janie Bullard
The Gin Baby, Kid Brooklyn Productions and Mermaid Sands Productions

Janie Bullard
Jane the Plain, Flux Theatre Ensemble

Janie Bullard
Pirira, Theatre 167

Christopher Loar
Mute, New York Neo-Futurists

Tim Schellenbaum & Alice Tolan-Mee
The Chairs, La MaMa in association with Skysaver Productions

*Christian Frederickson
The Awake, kef theatrical productions

Outstanding Innovative Design

Gyda Arber, Brian Fountain, David Gochfeld, and Allen Hahn
For Phone & Text Design
FutureMate, Brick Theater

Laia Cabrera, Isabelle Duverger, and Ildiko Nemeth
For Video Design
Cosmicomics, The New Stage Theatre Comapny

*Nicole Hill
For Puppet Design
Mute, New York Neo-Futurists

Kaitlyn Pietras
For Projection Design
The Gin Baby, Kid Brooklyn Productions and Mermaid Sands Productions

Matt Reeves
For Projection Design
And to the Republic, The Guerrilla Shakespeare Project

Jane Catherine Shaw & Theodora Skipitares
For Puppet Design
The Chairs, La MaMa in association with Skysaver Productions

Outstanding Original Music

Scott Allen Klopfenstein
Rubber Ducks and Sunsets, Ground Up Productions

Jennifer Makholm & Ian Wehrle
Relent, an Indie Musical, WorkShop Theater Company

Ellen Mandel
Don Juan In Hell, Phoenix Theatre Ensemble

*Scott Munson
Sawbones & the Diamond Eater, Days of the Giants LLC

Alexander Sovronsky
As You Like It, Happy Few Theatre Company

Alla Zagaykevych
Fire Water Night, La MaMa in association with Yara Arts Group

Outstanding Original Short Script

J.Stephen Brantley
Chicken-Fried Ciccone: A Twangy True Tale Of Transformation, Hard Sparks

Kate Gersten
First Love from The Spring Fling, F*It Club

Kate Kertez
Dumbo from Brooklyn Labyrinth, Oracle Theatre Inc

Mark Loewenstern
One is the Road fromSuper Shorts 2013, WorkShop Theater Company

*Lenore Wolf
April March, Fragments from an Unintegrated Life from East Side Stories: Movers, Metropolitan Playhouse

Nora Woolley
Hip, Nora Woolley

Outstanding Original Full-length Script

Nat Cassidy
Old Familiar Faces, Tin Drum Productions

Vincent Marano
Lights Narrow, Teatro Oscuro

Christie Perfetti Williams
An Appeal to the Woman of the House, Retro Productions

Sarah Shaefer
The Gin Baby, Kid Brooklyn Productions and Mermaid Sands Productions

*David Stallings
Dark Water, Manhattan Theatre Works (MTWorks)

J.Stephen Brantley
Pirira, Theatre 167

Outstanding Performance Art Production



At First Sight (and Other Stories), Broken Box Mime Company

FutureMate, Brick Theater

Magic Bullets, Buran Theatre Company

The Chairs, La MaMa in association with Skysaver Productions

*The God Project, La MaMa in association with Lone Wolf Tribe

The Maiden, The Nerve Tank

Outstanding Production of a Musical



A Little Night Music, The Gallery Players

*Allegro, Astoria Performing Arts Center

Candide – The Musical, Theater 2020

Fire Water Night, La MaMa in association with Yara Arts Group

Life on the Mississippi: A New Musical Play, WorkShop Theater Company

The Pregnancy of Angela Freak, AqUa MeRcUrY Creations

 

Outstanding Premiere Production of A Play



An Appeal to the Woman of the House, Retro Productions

Dark Water, Manhattan Theatre Works (MTWorks)

Frankenstein Upstairs, Gideon Productions

Lights Narrow, Teatro Oscuro

*Pirira, Theatre 167

The Complete and Condensed Stage Directions of Eugene O’Neill Vol 2, New York Neo-Futurists

 

Outstanding Revival of A Play



A Man’s World, Metropolitan Playhouse

As You Like It, Happy Few Theatre Company

*Don Juan In Hell, Phoenix Theatre Ensemble

Julius Caesar, Smith Street Stage

R+J: Star-Cross’d Death Match, Three Day Hangover

Wild, Sanguine Theatre Company

 

Special Awards

The Doric Wilson Independent Playwright Awards: *Kevin R. Free, , Mariah MacCarthy, and Donnetta Lavinia Grays

Outstanding Stage Manager: *Haejin Han

Artistic Achievement Award: *Dan Bianchi

Caffe Cino Fellowship Award: *Blessed Unrest!

Ellen Stewart Award:  Woodie King Jr.

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