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Fall 2018 Movie Preview

Below is a list of movies opening from September to December, organized chronologically by release date.

Among the movies featuring theater veterans: Oscar Isaac  in “Operation Finale” (Sept 14) and “Life,Itself” (Sept. 21); Robert Redford and Sissy Spacek in “The Old Man and the Gun” (Sept. 28); Viola Davis in “Widows” (Nov. 16); Lucas Hedges in “Boy Erased” (Nov 2) and “Ben is Back” (Dec 2) with Julia Roberts; Hugh Jackman as Gary Hart in “The Front Runner” (Nov. 7); Lin-Manuel Miranda in “Mary Poppins Returns” (Dec. 19)

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Free Outdoor Movies in NYC Summer 2018: A Schedule

You can watch a free movie outdoors in New York City every night this summer from now on — and whole movie series every weeknight except Tuesdays. The movies vary widely: current blockbusters (“Black Panther” on Coney Island) and new releases (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” on Pier 63 in Chelsea), movie musicals (“West Side Story” and “The Wizard of Oz”  in Prospect Park and “Hair” in Central Park), family fare, cult favorites, classics, art films and foreign films.. Below are the schedules for movie nights in some specific parks, piers, and plazas, as well as a beach, a battleship, and an island. Each movie series is linked to its website for more details.
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Oscar 2018 Winners

“The Shape of Water,” written and directed by Mexican Guillermo Del Toro, won four Oscars, including Best Picture. Coco won for animated feature, its plot based on the Mexican holiday of the Day of the Dead.

Below the complete list of Oscar winners presented tonight. (An asterisk next to those winners who are Broadway veterans)

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Oscar 2018 Nominations

Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” was nominated for 13 Oscars, just shy of the record, and Greta Gerwig became only the fifth woman in history nominated for best director, for “Lady Bird.”

The list of nominations for the 90th Academy Awards

Best picture
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
“The Post”
“The Shape of Water”
“Dunkirk”
“Lady Bird”
“Get Out”
“Call Me By Your Name”
“Phantom Thread”
“Darkest Hour”

Best actress in a leading role
Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”
Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
Meryl Streep, “The Post”

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Poll: Best Broadway Show Adapted From A Movie?

What is the best Broadway show adapted from a movie? Choose from the two dozen below, listed alphabetically, or add one that’s not on the list.

It wasn’t until 1970 that a Broadway show based on a movie won the Tony for best musical. Fittingly, the musical was Applause, inspired by All About Eve, a movie about the theater. Now every major Hollywood studio has a theatrical division, looking to create shows for Broadway, and every Broadway season includes a number of musicals that are based on movies. Next month alone, four new shows will open on Broadway based on original  movies (whose movie posters are picured above.) Add  to these the seven screen-to-stage adaptations already currently on Broadway.

Oscars 2016 Nominees: 88th Academy Award List

Best Picture

The Big Short, Brad Pitt, Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner

Bridge of Spies, Steven Spielberg, Marc Platt and Kristie Macosko Krieger

Brooklyn, Finola Dwyer and Amanda Posey

Mad Max: Fury Road, Doug Mitchell and George Miller

The Martian, Simon Kinberg, Ridley Scott, Michael Schaefer and Mark Huffam

The Revenant, Arnon Milchan, Steve Golin, Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Mary Parent and Keith Redmon

Room, Ed Guiney

Spotlight, Michael Sugar, Steve Golin, Nicole Rocklin and Blye Pagon Faust

Best Actor

Bryan Cranston, Trumbo

Matt Damon, The Martian

Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revneant

Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs

Eddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl

Best Actress

Cate Blanchett, Carol

Brie Larson, Room

Jennifer Lawrence, Joy

Charlotte Rampling, 45 Years

Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn

Best Supporting Actor

Christian Bale, The Big Short

Tom Hardy, The Revenant

Mark Ruffalo, Spotlight

Mark Rylance, Bridge of Spies

Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Best Supporting Actress

Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight

Rooney Mara, Carol

Rachel McAdams, Spotlight

Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl

Kate WInslest, Steve Jobs

Best Directing

Adam McKay, The Big Short

George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road

Alejandro González Iñárritu, The Revenant

Lenny Abrhamson, Room

Tom McCarthy, Spotlight

Best Film Editing            

The Big Short, Hank Corwin

Mad Max: Fury Road, Margaret Sixel

The Revenant, Stephen Mirrione

Spotlight, Tom McArdle

Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Maryann Brandon and Mary Jo Markey

Best Foreign Language Film

Colombia, Embrace of the Serpent

France, Mustang

Hungary, Son of Saul

Jordan, Theeb

Denmark, A War

 

Best Original Score

Thomas Newman, Bridge of Spies

Carter Burwell, Carol

Ennio Morricone, The Hateful Eight

Jóhann Jóhannsson, Sicario

John Williams, Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Best Production Design

Bridge of Spies, Production Design: Adam Stockhausen; Set Decoration: Rena DeAngelo and Bernhard Henrich

The Danish Girl, Production Design: Eve Stewart; Set Decoration: Michael Standish

Mad Max: Fury Road, Production Design: Colin Gibson; Set Decoration: Lisa Thompson

The Martian, Production Design: Arthur Max; Set Decoration: Celia Bobak

The Revenant, Production Design: Jack Fisk; Set Decoration: Hamish Purdy

Best Visual Effects

Ex Machina, Andrew Whitehurst, Paul Norris, Mark Ardington and Sara Bennett

Mad Max: Fury Road, Andrew Jackson, Tom Wood, Dan Oliver and Andy Williams

The Martian, Richard Stammers, Anders Langlands, Chris Lawrence and Steven Warner

The Revenant, Rich McBride, Matthew Shumway, Jason Smith and Cameron Waldbauer

Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Roger Guyett, Patrick Tubach, Neal Scanlan and Chris Corbould

Best Adapted Screenplay

The Big Short, Charles Randolph and Adam McKay

Brooklyn, Nick Hornby

Carol, Phyllis Nagy

The Martian, Drew Goddard

Room, Emma Donoghue

Best Original Screenplay

Bridge of Spies, Matt Charman and Ethan Coen & Joel Coen

Ex Machina, Alex Garland

Inside Out, Pete Docter, Meg LeFauve, Josh Cooley; Original story by Pete Docter, Ronnie del Carmen

Spotlight, Josh Singer and Tom McCarthy

Straight Outta Compton, Screenplay by Jonathan Herman and Andrea Berloff; Story by S. Leigh Savidge, Alan Wenkus and Andrea Berloff

Best Animated Feature Film

Anomalisa, Charlie Kaufman, Duke Johnson and Rosa Tran

Boy and the World, Alê Abreu

Inside Out, Pete Docter and Jonas Rivera

Shaun the Sheep Movie, Mark Burton and Richard Starzak

When Marnie Was There, Hiromasa Yonebayashi and Yoshiaki Nishimura

Best Cinematography                      

Carol, Ed Lachman

The Hateful Eight, Robert Richardson

Mad Max: Fury Road, John Seale

The Revenant, Emmanuel Lubezki

Sicario, Roger Deakins

Best Costume Design

Carol, Sandy Powell

Cinderella, Sandy Powell

The Danish Girl, Paco Delgado

Mad Max: Fury Road, Jenny Beavan

The Revenant, Jacqueline West

Best Documentary – Feature

Amy, Asif Kapadia and James Gay-Rees

Cartel Land, Matthew Heineman and Tom Yellin

The Look of Silence, Joshua Oppenheimer and Signe Byrge Sørensen

What Happened, Miss Simone?, Liz Garbus, Amy Hobby and Justin Wilkes

Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom, Evgeny Afineevsky and Den Tolmor

Best Documentary – Short Subject

Body Team 12, David Darg and Bryn Mooser

Chau, Beyond the Lines, Courtney Marsh and Jerry Franck

Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah, Adam Benzine

A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness, Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy

Last Day of Freedom, Dee Hibbert-Jones and Nomi Talisman

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

Mad Max: Fury Road, Lesley Vanderwalt, Elka Wardega and Damian Martin

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared, Love Larson and Eva von Bahr

The Revenant, Siân Grigg, Duncan Jarman and Robert Pandini

Best Original Song

“Earned It,” Fifty Shades of Grey, Abel Tesfaye, Ahmad Balshe, Jason Daheala Quenneville and Stephan Moccio

“Manta Ray,” Racing Extinction, J. Ralph and Antony Hegarty

“Simple Song #3,” Youth, David Lang

“‘Til It Happens to You,” The Haunting Ground, Diane Warren and Lady Gaga

“Writings on the Wall,” Spectre, Jimmy Napes and Sam Smith

Best Animated Short Film

Bear Story, Gabriel Osorio and Pato Escala

Prologue, Richard Williams and Imogen Sutton

Sanjay’s Super Team, Sanjay Patel and Nicole Grindle

We Can’t Live Without Cosmos, Konstantin Bronzit

World of Tomorrow, Don Hertzfeldt

Best Live Action Short Film

Ave Maria, Basil Khalil and Eric Dupont

Day One, Henry Hughes

Everything Will Be Okay (Alles Wird Gut), Patrick Vollrath

Shok, Jamie Donoughue

Stutterer, Benjamin Cleary and Serena Armitage

Best Sound Editing

Mad Max: Fury Road, Mark Mangini and David White

The Martian, Oliver Tarney

The Revenant, Martin Hernandez and Lon Bender

Sicario, Alan Robert Murray

Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Matthew Wood and David Acord

Best Sound Mixing

Bridge of Spies, Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom and Drew Kunin

Mad Max: Fury Road, Chris Jenkins, Gregg Rudloff and Ben Osmo

The Martian, Paul Massey, Mark Taylor and Mac Ruth

The Revenant, Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño, Randy Thom and Chris Duesterdiek

Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Andy Nelson, Christopher Scarabosio and Stuart Wilson

Tom Hanks Acts Out His Entire Film Career in 8 Minutes

SleeplessinSeattleWith the help of Tony-winner James Corden and lots of backdrops, Tom Hanks acts out the movies in which he has starred over the last three decades, from Splash (1984) to Saving Mr. Banks (2013). An auspicious debut for The Late Late Show with James Corden.

 

 

 

“The Spirit of This Bridge”: Glory Song Acceptance Speeches by Common and John Legend

Common_Legend_SpeechBelow is a transcript of the speeches by the writers of the Oscar-winning song “Glory,” from the film Selma:

Lonnie Lynn (Common):

First, I would like to thank God, who lives in us all. Recently, John and I got to go to Selma and perform “Glory” on the same bridge that Dr. King and the people of the civil rights movement marched on 50 years ago. This bridge was once a landmark of a divided nation but now is a symbol for change. The spirit of this bridge transcends race, gender, religion, sexual orientation and social status. The spirit of this bridge connects the kid from the South Side of Chicago dreaming of a better life to those in France standing up for their freedom of expression, to the people in Hong Kong protesting for democracy. This bridge was built on hope, welded with compassion and elevated by love for all human beings.

John Stephens (John Legend):

Thank you. Nina Simone said it’s an artist’s duty to reflect the times in which we live. We wrote this song for a film that was based on events that were 50 years ago but we say that Selma is now because the struggle for justice is right now. We know that the Voting Rights Act that they fought for 50 years ago is being compromised right now in this country today. We know that right now the struggle for freedom and justice is real. We live in the most incarcerated country in the world. There are more black men under correctional control today than were under slavery in 1850. When people are marching with our song, we want to tell you we are with you, we see you, we love you, and march on. God bless you.

 

Lyrics to Glory:

One day, when the glory comes
It will be ours, it will be ours
Oh, one day, when the war is one
We will be sure, we will be here sure
Oh, glory, glory
Oh, glory, glory

Hands to the Heavens, no man, no weapon
Formed against, yes glory is destined
Every day women and men become legends
Sins that go against our skin become blessings
The movement is a rhythm to us
Freedom is like religion to us
Justice is juxtaposition in us
Justice for all just ain’t specific enough
One son died, his spirit is revisitin’ us
Truant livin’ livin’ in us, resistance is us
That’s why Rosa sat on the bus
That’s why we walk through Ferguson with our hands up
When it go down we woman and man up
They say, “Stay down” and we stand up
Shots, we on the ground, the camera panned up
King pointed to the mountain top and we ran up

One day, when the glory comes
It will be ours, it will be ours
Oh, one day, when the war is one
We will be sure, we will be here sure
Oh, glory, glory
Oh, glory, glory glory

Now the war is not over
Victory isn’t won
And we’ll fight on to the finish
Then when it’s all done
We’ll cry glory, oh glory
We’ll cry glory, oh glory

Selma’s now for every man, woman and child
Even Jesus got his crown in front of a crowd
They marched with the torch, we gon’ run with it now
Never look back, we done gone hundreds of miles
From dark roads he rose, to become a hero
Facin’ the league of justice, his power was the people
Enemy is lethal, a king became regal
Saw the face of Jim Crow under a bald eagle
The biggest weapon is to stay peaceful
We sing, our music is the cuts that we bleed through
Somewhere in the dream we had an epiphany
Now we right the wrongs in history
No one can win the war individually
It takes the wisdom of the elders and young people’s energy
Welcome to the story we call victory
Comin’ of the Lord, my eyes have seen the glory

One day, when the glory comes
It will be ours, it will be ours
Oh, one day, when the war is one
We will be sure, we will be here sure
Oh, glory, glory
Oh, glory, glory glory

When the war is done, when it’s all said and done
We’ll cry glory, oh glory

 

“Stay Weird, Stay Different” moving speech from Oscar winner Graham Moore

Graham Moore

Graham Moore, 33,  in accepting the 2015 Oscar for adapted screenplay for The Imitation Game, gave the following acceptance speech:

“Thank you so much to the Academy and to Oprah for this. I need to shower my love and kisses on everyone who’s a part of our Imitation Game family. Morten, Nora, Ido, Teddy, Keira, Benedict, Billy, Alexandre, our entire cast, Maria, who’s back there somewhere. I love you guys so much. Thank you for this film. I’m so indebted to you for it.

“So, here’s the thing: Alan Turing never got to stand on a stage like this and look out at all of these disconcertingly attractive faces and I do. And that’s the most unfair thing I think I’ve ever heard. So, in this brief time here, what I want to use it to do is to say this:

“When I was 16 years old, I tried to kill myself because I felt weird and I felt different and I felt like I did not belong. And now I’m standing here and, so, I would like for this moment to be for that kid out there who feels like she’s weird or she’s different or she doesn’t fit in anywhere. Yes, you do. I promise you do. You do. Stay weird. Stay different. And then when it’s your turn and you are standing on this stage, please pass the same message to the next person who comes along. Thank you so much.”

2015 Oscar Winners

Birdman1

Birdman, big 2015 Oscar winner

 

Below in red with an asterisk, are the winners of the 87th Academy Awards. Broadway looms big in the Oscar wins, with the best picture about a fictional Broadway play, and three of the four best performance Oscars going to Broadway veterans (Eddie Redymayne, Julianne Moore, and J.K. Simmons.)

(See details of the Hollywood-Broadway connection at Broadway at the Oscars)

 

Birdman

Birdman